The Value of the Surface ECG for the Diagnosis and Management of Lyme Carditis.

The Value of the Surface ECG for the Diagnosis and Management of Lyme Carditis. Curr Cardiol Rev. 2020 Mar 11;: Authors: Yeung C, Al-Turki M, Baranchuk A Abstract Lyme carditis (LC) is an early-disseminated manifestation of Lyme disease, most commonly presenting as high-degree atrioventricular block (AVB). The degree of AVB can fluctuate rapidly within minutes, and progression to third-degree AVB is potentially fatal if not recognized and managed promptly. However, the AVB in LC is often transient, and usually resolves with appropriate antibiotic therapy. LC should be on the differential diagnosis in young patients presenting with new high-degree AVB and factors that increase the index of suspicion for Lyme disease. The Suspicious Index in Lyme Carditis (SILC) score helps clinicians risk stratify for LC. A systematic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of LC minimizes the unnecessary implantation of permanent pacemakers. PMID: 32164515 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Cardiology Reviews - Category: Cardiology Tags: Curr Cardiol Rev Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 24 February 2020Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Cecilie Lerche Nordberg, Jacob Bodilsen, Fredrikke Christie Knudtzen, Merete Storgaard, Christian Brandt, Lothar Wiese, Birgitte Rønde Hansen, Åse Bengård Andersen, Henrik Nielsen, Anne-Mette Lebech, DASGIB study groupAbstractThe goal of this paper is to characterize the clinical presentation, serological results, current antibiotic treatment practice, including compliance with current European guidelines, and outcome in adults with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) diagnosed at department of infectious diseases ...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Several well-controlled clinical trials have shown that prolonged antibiotic therapy has no benefit in relieving posttreatment Lyme disease symptoms. However, some insist that such symptoms are due to a persistent Borrelia burgdorferi infection requiring prolonged antibiotic therapy to resolve. This unproven view is bolstered by the results of in vitro experiments where small numbers of viable B. burgdorferi can be detected after treatment with antibiotics. The results described in the present work suggest that the presence of persisters can best be explained by classic biochemical kinetics and that there are alternative e...
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Five clinical trials show that prolonged antibiotic therapy has no clear and lasting benefit in relieving post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms, a condition often called “chronic Lyme disease”1-4; no evidence of active infection was found in any of these studies by culture or molecular methods. Despite such findings, as well as the fact that evidence of harm was unambiguous,2,3 some still insist that these symptoms are due to a persistent Borrelia burgdorferi in fection that can be eliminated only by several months of additional treatment with different kinds of antibiotics, given either singly or in combination.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewSince recognition in 1975, Lyme disease has become the most common vector-borne illness in North America and Europe. The clinical features are well-characterized and treatment is usually curative, but misperceptions about morbidity persist. The purpose of this review is to examine advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease, as well as ongoing management challenges.Recent FindingsIt is useful to recognize that Lyme disease occurs in stages, with early- and late-stage disease. Clinical expression is in part determined by Borrelial variability. For example, some strains ofBorrelia burgdor...
Source: Current Rheumatology Reports - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Rationale: Both Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group Rickettsiae (SFGR) are pathogens carried by ticks. There is a possibility of co-infection with these tick-borne diseases. Patient concerns: Male patient, 63 years-of-age, admitted to hospital with skin rash presenting for 1 week and fever with cough and expectoration for 3 days before admission. Diagnoses: We diagnosed that the patient was co-infected by B burgdorferi sl and SFGR using laboratory test results and the patient's clinical manifestations. Interventions: The patient started therapy with oral minocycline, then levofloxacin by intr...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
Purpose of review To review the recent evidence clarifying the symptomatology and diagnosis of nervous system Lyme disease. Recent findings Two-tier testing combining pairs of ELISAs, using C6 or VlsE assays to replace second tier Western blots, may eliminate confusion about test interpretation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can be informative in diagnosing central nervous system (CNS) Lyme disease, not peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders. CSF CXCL13 may provide useful adjunctive information in CNS infection; its specificity remains to be defined. Lyme encephalopathy is not indicative of CNS infection. Post treatmen...
Source: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: CNS INFECTIONS: Edited by Adarsh Bhimraj Source Type: research
Lyme disease (LD) is an infectious multi-system illness caused by the bacterial genus Borrelia and spread by bites of infected ticks. Although most patients are successfully treated by timely antibiotic therapy, ...
Source: BMC Public Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Authors: Feng J, Li T, Yee R, Yuan Y, Bai C, Cai M, Shi W, Embers M, Brayton C, Saeki H, Gabrielson K, Zhang Y Abstract Although most patients with Lyme disease can be cured with a 2-4 week antibiotic therapy, about 10-20% of patients continue to suffer prolonged persistent symptoms, a condition called post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). The cause for PTLDS is unclear and hotly debated. Borrelia burgdorferi develops morphological variants under stress conditions but their significance is not clear. Here we isolated the biofilm-like microcolony (MC) and planktonic (spirochetal form and round body) (SP) var...
Source: Discovery Medicine - Category: Research Tags: Discov Med Source Type: research
Authors: Weiss T, Zhu P, White H, Posner M, Wickiser JK, Washington MA, Barnhill J Abstract Lyme disease is a continuing threat to military personnel operating in arboriferous and mountainous environments. Here we present the case of a 24-year-old Second Lieutenant, a recent graduate from the United States Military Academy, with a history of Lyme disease who developed recurrent knee effusions following surgery to correct a hip impingement. Although gonococcal arthritis was initially suspected from preliminary laboratory results, a comprehensive evaluation contradicted this diagnosis. Despite antibiotic therapy, asp...
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
Contributors : Jerome Bouquet ; Charles Y ChiuSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensMost Lyme disease patients treated with appropriate antibiotics recover rapidly and completely, but a minority of patients develop persistent symptoms correlating with disseminated disease, a greater severity of illness at presentation, and delayed antibiotic therapy. When lingering or recurrent symptoms are associated with a functional decline and persist for greater than 6 months, patients are considered to meet clinical criteria for post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS), although th...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
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