A Promising Hub For Digital Health: Kazakhstan

Sharing borders with Russia, China, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan, you find the world’s largest landlocked country, the Republic of Kazakhstan. Conversely, with its population of over 18 million spanning across an area of 2,724,900 km², the country also has one of the lowest population densities worldwide, at less than 6 people per square kilometre. Being a relatively new republic and with its widespread inhabitants, Kazakhstan poses as an adequate hub for digital health to expand. Such a young republic’s ministry of health can develop around newer technologies and strategies brought forth with the advent of digital health like telemedicine to connect inhabitants of remote areas, mobile apps to allow patients to self-manage their health and robot-assisted surgeries for minimally invasive operations. In fact, these are already realities sprouting in the transcontinental country. A rural area in Kazakhstan. Source: http://www.euro.who.int/ While the Kazakhstani healthcare landscape seems to be on the right track to digital health, there are still challenges to be overcome. We interviewed Dr. Olzhas Abishev, Vice Minister of Healthcare of the Republic of Kazakhstan, and Mr. Yerbol Spatayev, Public Health and Informatization Specialist at the same ministry, to have a better picture of the adoption of digital health in Kazakhstan. Overcoming struggles “In Kazakhstan you get [universal health coverage] only if you are ready to pay fo...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy digital health digital health strategy health policy Source Type: blogs

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Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsConsistent with previous large-scale meta-analyses and reviews, results supported the causal role of higher BMI in increasing the risk of several common causes of death, including cancers with increasing global incidence. We also found positive effects of BMI on mortality from respiratory disease, prostate cancer, and lung cancer, which has been inconsistently reported in the literature, suggesting that the causal role of higher BMI in mortality from these diseases may be underestimated. Furthermore, we expect different patterns of bias in the current observational and IV analyses; therefore, the similarities be...
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding WaistlinesBy  JANE E. BRODY NOV. 13, 2017Paul Rogers I hope you ’re not chomping on a bagel or, worse, a doughnut while you read about what is probably the most serious public health irony of the last half century in this country: As one major killer — smoking — declined, another rose precipitously to take its place: obesity.Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.Today, obesity and smoking remain the two leading causes of pre...
Source: Dr Portnay - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
If the successes in technological development achieved over the past few hundred years is teaching us anything, perhaps it should be that individual members of a species that evolved in an environment of pervasive scarcity and intermittent famine are not well equipped for an environment of consistent plenty. Our biochemistry and our instincts lead us astray: eat too many calories and life expectancy and long-term health will suffer for it. This is not new. We are no different from our ancestors in this aspect of the human condition. The change lies in the fact that we now live in an age so wealthy and capable that consiste...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
The obesity epidemic continues to dominate headlines--and for good reason. Obesity is a leading cause of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke. Many of these conditions occur in adults but often begin in childhood. This September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. By knowing the facts and taking steps to help your children live a healthier lifestyle, childhood obesity and its resulting complications may be prevented. The Facts According to the Centers for Disease Control &Prevention (CDC), one in three children in the U.S. is overweight or obese. Childhood obesity doubled in children a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Kahn and Bullard “recommend that waist circumference be added to BMI [body mass index] as a primary tool for assessing adiposity.”1 Suggesting “a need for alternative approaches to anthropometry”1 is necessary because BMI incorrectly classifies obesity by 39%.2 Many adults are obese by American Society of Ba riatric Physicians criteria of body fat: ≥25% for men and ≥30% for women.3 Normal-weight obese adults have increased mortality risk from diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, stroke, cancer, dyslipidemia, liver and gallbladder disease, sleep apnea and respiratory problems, and osteoarthritis.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: AJM online Source Type: research
Authors: Xu S, Xue Y Abstract Pediatric or childhood obesity is the most prevalent nutritional disorder among children and adolescents worldwide. Approximately 43 million individuals are obese, 21-24% children and adolescents are overweight, and 16-18% of individuals have abdominal obesity. The prevalence of obesity is highest among specific ethnic groups. Obesity increases the risk of heart diseases in children and adults. Childhood obesity predisposes the individual to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, liver and kidney diseases and causes reproductive dysfunction in adults. Obe...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: Journals (General) Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
Amy Schumer said in her humorous acceptance speech at the Glamour Women of the Year Awards: "I'm like 160 pounds right now, and I can catch a dick whenever I want, and that's the truth." The line, like many in her speech, is obviously very funny. But the humor is directed at a misperception that is not so funny. With our society's superficial focus on youth and appearance, we have emphasized all the wrong reasons for maintaining a healthy body weight, which has nothing to do with "catching dick." We are sold the idea that remaining slim is primarily important as a means of attracting the opposite sex,...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Conclusions The costs are substantial, and urgent public health action is required in Ireland to address the problem of increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity, which if left unchecked will lead to unsustainable cost escalation within the health service and unacceptable societal costs.
Source: BMJ Open - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Open access, Epidemiology, Health economics Research Source Type: research
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