Amyloid Plaques Containing Nucleic Acids Drive Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of protein aggregates in the brain. These are misfolded and altered versions of proteins that can act as seeds for solid deposits to form and spread in the brain. These deposits are surrounded by a halo of toxic biochemistry that harms and eventually kills neurons. Amyloid-β aggregates are present in the early stages of the condition, while tau aggregates cause much greater harm and cell death in the later stages. Alzheimer's disease is also an inflammatory condition, however, in which chronic inflammation and altered behavior of the central nervous system immune cells known as microglia is clearly very influential. The interaction between amyloid-β, tau, and inflammation is somewhat debated. One view is that early amyloid-β aggregation causes microglia to become dysfunction and inflammatory, and this behavior generates an environment of chronic inflammation that results in tau aggregation. Alternatively, amyloid-β accumulation may just be a side-effect of persistent infections that produce chronic inflammation in the brain. Both of these options might be true to varying degrees in different patients. It is quite challenging to pick apart the mechanisms of early Alzheimer's in humans, as it isn't feasible to open up large numbers of living brains to take a look at their biochemistry. Today's research materials add support for the more complex picture of differing contributions and interacti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Elizabeth Sahagun, Brent B. Bachman, Kimberly P. Kinzig
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
DEMENTIA can be tricky to pick up on in the earliest stages. However, mounting research indicates a certain time of day when symptoms may be more noticeable. What time do you need to be on full alert?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
TYPE 2 diabetes may feel like a minefield - can you eat this or that without spiking blood sugar levels? If you're feeling peckish, what's a good, healthy option for lunch?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Individually customized, multicomponent exercise programs lead to improved levels of cognitive function, depression, and quality of life, especially among those who are more frail. PMID: 33029968 [PubMed]
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: J Clin Neurol Source Type: research
Conclusion: SLT induces relaxation of rat isolated tail artery through endothelium-independent mechanisms. The SLT-induced vasodilatation appeared to be jointly meditated by blockages of extracellular Ca2+ influx via receptor-gated and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and inhibition of the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. PMID: 33029174 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Aβ-Induced Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) Gene Delivery Suppresses Activation of Microglia-Like BV-2 Cells. Neural Plast. 2020;2020:8888871 Authors: Yu T, Quan H, Xu Y, Dou Y, Wang F, Lin Y, Qi X, Zhao Y, Liu X Abstract Compelling evidence from basic molecular biology has demonstrated the crucial role of microglia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Microglia were believed to play a dual role in both promoting and inhibiting Alzheimer's disease progression. It is of great significance to regulate the function of microglia and make them develop in a favorabl...
Source: Neural Plasticity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neural Plast Source Type: research
In this study, we used UPLC-MS to generate a chromatographic fingerprinting of BTF and identified five possible active ingredients, including stilbene glycoside; epimedin A1, B, and C; and icariin. We also showed that oral administration of BTF reversed the cognitive defects in an Aβ 1-42 fibril-infused rat model of AD, protected synaptic ultrastructure in the CA1 region, and restored the expression of BDNF, synaptotagmin (Syt), and PSD95. These effects likely occurred through the BDNF-activated receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB)/Akt/CREB signaling pathway. Furthermore, BTF exhibited no short-term or chronic toxicity i...
Source: Neural Plasticity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neural Plast Source Type: research
Abstract As the global population ages, the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases has risen. Furthermore, it has been suggested that depression, especially in elderly people, may also be an indication of latent neurodegeneration. Stroke, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Parkinson's disease (PD) are usually accompanied by depression. The urgent challenge is further enforced by psychiatric comorbid conditions, particularly the feeling of despair in these patients. Fortunately, as our understanding of the neurobiological substrates of maladies affecting the central nervous system (CNS) has increased, more therapeutic ...
Source: Neural Plasticity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neural Plast Source Type: research
We report a new class of natural-product-inspired covalent inhibitors of telomerase that target the catalytic active site. Age-Related Epigenetic Changes that Suppress Mitochondrial Function https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/age-related-epigenetic-changes-that-suppress-mitochondrial-function/ Today's open access research reports on two specific epigenetic changes observed in old individuals that act to reduce mitochondrial function. This joins an existing list of genes for which expression changes are known to impact mitochondrial function with age. A herd of hundreds of mitochondria are found ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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