Americans Are Being Encouraged to Work From Home During the Coronavirus Outbreak. For Millions, That ’s Impossible

Ever since the coronavirus began spreading in her home state of Washington, Azia Jenkins has spent hours cleaning her workplace: a 2017 Jeep Patriot. Jenkins, who escorts children for supervised visits on behalf of Child Protective Services, fears that her vehicle is becoming a petri dish, putting herself, the children she supervises, and her own two daughters at risk. Her new cleansing ritual, which she performs before and after dropping off any children, involves wiping down the compact SUV’s handles, seats, and steering wheel with Clorox wipes. She’s also trying to teach her children how important it is to wash their hands as much as they can. Public health experts are recommending that companies encourage employees to work from home to prevent the potentially deadly coronavirus from spreading around offices, public transit and elsewhere. Many firms, like Apple, Microsoft and Google, are following that advice. But remote work isn’t an option for people like Jenkins, who, like millions of other Americans in fields like retail, dining and other industries, can’t simply log on to software like Outlook, Slack or Google Hangouts to do her job. “Either I stay home, and I miss out on money, or I continue to work and I get sicker and sicker or I get other people sick,” says Jenkins, 26. For all the promise of high-speed Internet and other innovations that can make it possible for us to work from anywhere, only about 29% of American employees a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV onetime Source Type: news

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Chris EdwardsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)says that it “has a  unique mission—to save lives by deploying effective, proven strategies to prevent, detect, and rapidly respond to disease outbreaks at their source.”But the CDCwas slow to recognize the size of the COVID-19 threat and it fumbled the ball in numerous ways.CDC DirectorRobert Redfieldtweeted January 14 that “there is no confirmed person‐​to‐​person spread” of the illness, and on January 28 heemailed CDC colleagues that “the virus is not spreading in the U.S. at this time. ”A ProPublicaan...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
In late February, several weeks before the coronavirus outbreak shut down American cities and rose to the level of a national crisis, Kerri Rawson began to feel sick. “I was hit out of nowhere with what feels like the flu at first,” says Rawson, who also has asthma and takes cardiac medication for high-blood pressure. “You’re fine, and then all of a sudden you have a fever below 100°F and chest congestion.” Rawson is a 41-year-old writer and mother of two in Florida. (You may recognize her name from her 2019 memoir, about growing up as the daughter of a serial killer.) Her fever lasted for...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news
Study into effects of coronavirus curbs also finds less asthma and preterm birthsThe improvement in air quality over the past month of the coronavirus lockdown has led to 11,000 fewer deaths from pollution in the UK and elsewhere in Europe, a study has revealed.Sharp falls in road traffic and industrial emissions have also resulted in 1.3m fewer days of work absence, 6,000 fewer children developing asthma, 1,900 avoided emergency room visits and 600 fewer preterm births, according to the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Air pollution Environment Coronavirus outbreak Science World news UK news Health Source Type: news
A few blog readers have suggested to me, privately, that the awful flu I had back in early January might have been Covid-19. But well before I had read their suggestions, that same thought had occurred to me, too, in the early days of the outbreak here in Italy. So this morning I decided to write a post about it, just for the record. I certainly did have some of the Covid-19 symptoms, namely: fatigue (probably my very first symptom) sore throat (also an early symptom) terrible intestinal woes (ditto as above) high fever…a very high fever aches, of course nasal congestion cough (see below) and, finally, pneumonia, y...
Source: Margaret's Corner - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Blogroll coronavirus covid-19 Source Type: blogs
I am fearful for the future, uncertain for how my skills will hold up when put to testCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageI am an ophthalmologist. I am the doctor you see for your cataract surgery, the doctor your grandmother sees to have her age-related macular degeneration checked, the one who prescribed the bedtime drops to slow down your grandfather ’s glaucoma. In the next few weeks I will be the doctor your father sees for his stroke, the doctor who treats your grandmother’s heart failure, the doctor you see in A&E to treat your asthma. Potentially the doctor you meet in inte...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Doctors Society Health Society Professionals Infectious diseases Science NHS Work & careers Guardian Careers Source Type: news
(BOISE, Idaho) — They are two disasters that require opposite responses: To save lives and reduce the spread of COVID-19, people are being told to remain isolated. But in a wildfire, thousands of firefighters must work in close quarters for weeks at a time. Wildfires have already broken out in Texas and Florida, and agencies are scrambling to finish plans for a new approach. They are considering waivers for some training requirements to previously-certified crew members, and moving some training online. Other proposals include limiting fire engines to a driver and one passenger, requiring other crew members to ride i...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Environment News Desk wire Source Type: news
Nicola Davis speaks toDr Andy Whittamore about the effects of Covid-19 on people with asthma and what they can do to protect themselvesContinue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Science Asthma Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Society World news Source Type: news
By GRACE CORDOVANO PhD, BCPA To be honest, the United States blew it on the mask front. From a public health, caregiver and patient safety, as well as community transmission standpoint, we are at least 3 months late to game. Anytime a brand new virus that humanity does not have any immunity to makes an appearance, is highly contagious, starts rapidly infecting people as well as the doctors and nurses caring for them, hospitalizing, and killing them in concerning numbers across the globe, we should enable every proactive safety measure at our disposal. The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the US was on January 20,...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy coronavirus Grace Cordovano masks Pandemic Source Type: blogs
By now, you’ve probably heard this warning about the new coronavirus pandemic: those who are older and have a chronic medical condition are at increased risk for severe disease and death. If you fall into this category, here’s important information about the coronavirus outbreak tailored to you. If you look at the data, older adults and those with chronic health problems who get COVID-19 are more likely to require hospitalization and admission to an intensive care unit. And so far in the US, 80% of the deaths from the new coronavirus virus have occurred in people who were older. But this raises a number of ques...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthy Aging Infectious diseases Men's Health Prevention Women's Health Source Type: blogs
(HAMBURG, Pa.) — The spring breezes of 2020 are carrying more than just tree pollen. There’s a whiff of paranoia in the air. For millions of seasonal allergy sufferers, the annual onset of watery eyes and scratchy throats is bumping up against the global spread of a new virus that produces its own constellation of respiratory symptoms. Forecasters are predicting a brutal spring allergy season for swaths of the U.S. at the same time that COVID-19 cases are rising dramatically. That’s causing angst for people who never have had to particularly worry about their hay fever, other than to stock up on antihista...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
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