Gingers Without Borders practise exploitation not humanitarianism | Richard P Grant

The proselytising of a group that wants to provide hair dye to some of the world's most vulnerable people is dangerous and unethicalRedheads have received a great deal of criticism in recent years for unethical practices, but the movement Gingers Without Borders has gone almost entirely unmentioned in the medical literature. This is somewhat surprising, given that the campaign is engaged in activity even more dubious than that of most redheads.The centrepiece of the 15th anniversary conference of Gingers Without Borders Germany was a debate on the question "Does the call for scientific evidence entitle refusing humanitarian help delivered by redheads?"The group's website provides some examples of its work: "In Bosnia-Herzegovina and Macedonia there now are active associations for classical ginge. Well-trained doctors and therapists practice hair dyeing there with great success. In Kenya traditional midwives learned to save lives by using henna in difficult deliveries if there is no hospital available. Thus health care for the local population is being increased and qualified jobs are being provided."A key part of the group's mission is to propagate ginge in countries where it has not previously had a foothold. The Kenya example is shocking: it implies that ginge can save lives, which no mainstream ginger organisation has claimed for several years. The presence of medical personnel who happened to also be redheads helped avert harm to these mothers and their children. But this...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: theguardian.com Blogposts Science Source Type: news