SARS influencing response to novel coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic in Singapore

(American Roentgen Ray Society) This latest installment in the open-access AJR Collection regarding the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) explains how a tertiary hospital in Singapore responded to the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)--offering a thorough summary of ground operational considerations for diagnostic, vascular, and interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine and molecular imaging specialists, as well as radiographers and nursing units presently reacting to the COVID-19 epidemic.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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COVID-19 is caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (Cov)-2, an enveloped virus with a positive-polarity, single-stranded RNA genome. The initial outbreak of the pandemic began in December 2019, and it is affecting the human health of the global community. In common with previous pandemics (Influenza H1N1 and SARS-CoV) and the epidemics of Middle east respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, CoVs target bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. Virus protein ligands (e.g., haemagglutinin or trimeric spike glycoprotein for Influenza and CoV, respectively) interact with cellular receptors, such as (dependin...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Yehua Shen, Chien-shan Cheng, Peng Wang, Xu Zhu, Guangyan Lei, Yong Fang, Hailiang Li, Weijun Fan, Hongming Pan, Zhe Tang, Kuansheng Ma, Xiaoguang Li, Zhengyu Lin, Yiping Zhuang, Xin Ye, Bo Zhai, Yue Han, Jinhua Huang, Huixiong Xu, Rongqin Zheng, Rufu Chen, Jie Yu, Dong Xu, Zhongmin Wang, Zhiqiang MengJournal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 2020 16(2):350-355 The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic since its outbreak in December 2019, which posed a threat to the safety and well-being of people on a global scale. Cancer patients are at high risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavi...
Source: Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Study raises hope of immunity even for those without severe symptomsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA medical study in France suggests even mild cases of coronavirus infection, not requiring hospital treatment, produce antibodies in almost all patients, with the body ’s defences against the virus increasing during the weeks of recovery.The research, led by a team from the Pasteur Institute, raises hopes that everyone who has had the disease could acquire some degree of immunity, although it is not clear for how long or to what degree.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Medical research Immunology France Sars Biochemistry and molecular biology Epidemics Infectious diseases Europe World news Microbiology Science Source Type: news
IN DECEMBER 2019 a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) disease (coronavirus-2019 [COVID-19]) was reported in Wuhan, China, and it rapidly spread across the world.1 On February 21, a 78-year-old man became the first person in Europe to die as a result of COVID-19 in a community hospital in Veneto, a region of about 5,000,000 people located in northeast Italy. Since then, SARS-CoV-2 has become a relentless epidemic in Italy, with a dramatic increase in the number of patients showing COVID-19 –related acute respiratory failure and hypoxemia.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Special Article Source Type: research
Conclusions: Preliminary data for PIBD patients during COVID-19 outbreak are reassuring. Standard IBD treatments including biologics should continue at present through the pandemic, especially in children who generally have more severe IBD course on one hand, and milder SARS-CoV-2 infection on the other.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Special Features Source Type: research
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
Conclusion In 1919 George A. Soper1 wrote that the deadly Spanish Flu pandemic that swept around the earth was without any precedents, and that there had been no such catastrophe ‘so sudden, so devastating and so universal’. He remarked that, “The most astonishing thing about the pandemic was the complete mystery which surrounded it. Nobody seemed to know what the disease was, where it came from or how to stop it. Anxious minds are inquiring today whether another wave of it will come again”. With close to 3 million positive cases and around 0.2 million deaths worldwide, the coronavirus has compelle...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Since December 2019, the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2(SARS-CoV-2)has swept 200 countries and regions worldwide [1] and has become a "Public Health Emergency of International Concern" (PHEIC). Pregnant women are susceptible to COVID-19 due to the changes in their physiology and the adaptability of their immune system [2]. During the outbreak of COVID-19, prenatal examinations may be postponed, however, delivery cannot be delayed, and the delivery room should work as usual. During this period, it is particularly important to quickly identify high-risk groups and to provide appropriate protection ...
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract The 2019 coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) continues to expand worldwide. Although the number of cases and the death rate among children and adolescents are reported to be low compared to adults, limited data have been reported. We urgently need to find treatment and vaccine to stop the epidemic. Vaccine development is in progress, but any approved and effective vaccine for COVID-19 is at least 12 to 18 months. The World Health Organization (WHO), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) have issued instructions and strategies for containing COVID-...
Source: Infectious Disorders Drug Targets - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Infect Disord Drug Targets Source Type: research
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