Dilated cardiomyopathies and non-compaction cardiomyopathy.

Dilated cardiomyopathies and non-compaction cardiomyopathy. Herz. 2020 Feb 27;: Authors: Hänselmann A, Veltmann C, Bauersachs J, Berliner D Abstract Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is the most common form of cardiomyopathy and one of the most common causes of heart failure. It is characterized by left or biventricular dilation and a reduced systolic function. The causes are manifold and range from myocarditis to alcohol and other toxins, to rheumatological, endocrinological, and metabolic diseases. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a special form that occurs at the end of or shortly after pregnancy. Genetic mutations can be detected in approximately 30-50% of DCM patients. Owing to the growing possibilities of genetic diagnostics, increasingly more triggering variants and hereditary mechanisms emerge. This is particularly important with regard to risk stratification for patients with variants with an increased risk of arrhythmias. Patient prognosis is determined by the occurrence of heart failure and arrhythmias. In addition to the treatment of the underlying disease or the elimination of triggering harmful toxins, therapy consists in guideline-directed heart failure treatment including drug and device therapy. PMID: 32107565 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Herz - Category: Cardiology Tags: Herz Source Type: research

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