Dopamine fasting: Misunderstanding science spawns a maladaptive fad

The dopamine fast, created by California psychiatrist Dr. Cameron Sepah, has very little to do with either fasting or dopamine. As Sepah told the New York Times, “Dopamine is just a mechanism that explains how addictions can become reinforced, and makes for a catchy title. The title’s not to be taken literally.” Unfortunately, with such a snazzy name, who could resist? This is where the misconceptions begin. What’s the thinking behind a dopamine fast? What Sepah intended with his dopamine fast was a method, based on cognitive behavioral therapy, by which we can become less dominated by the unhealthy stimuli — the texts, the notifications, the beeps, the rings — that accompany living in a modern, technology-centric society. Instead of automatically responding to these reward-inducing cues, which provide us with an immediate but short-lived charge, we ought to allow our brains to take breaks and reset from this potentially addictive bombardment. The idea is that by allowing ourselves to feel lonely or bored, or to find pleasures in doing simpler and more natural activities, we will regain control over our lives and be better able to address compulsive behaviors that may be interfering with our happiness. The six compulsive behaviors he cites as behaviors that may respond to a dopamine fast are: emotional eating, excessive internet usage and gaming, gambling and shopping, porn and masturbation, thrill and novelty seeking, and recreational drug...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Health trends Mind body medicine Stress Source Type: blogs

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Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Coronavirus General Loneliness Relaxation and Meditation COVID-19 Mindfulness pandemic Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Bipolar Disorder Detox Dual Diagnosis World Bipolar Day Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Medications Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this cross-sectional survey is to explore the current state of Internet addiction (IA) in Chinese medical students and its connection with medical students' sleep quality and self-injury behavior. METHODS: Respondents were...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news
This study aimed to investigate relationships between severities of internet gaming disorder (IGD) and problematic social media use (operationalized as social media addiction; SMA) with sleep quality and psychological distress among young adults. A cross-sectional study with snowball sampling was conducted among Hong Kong university students in 2019. All participants (n = 300; mean (SD) age = 20.89 (1.48); 122 males (40.67%)) responded to an online survey that included Chinese versions of the Internet Gaming Disorder Scale-Short Form (IGDS9-SF), Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale (BSMAS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (P...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
In this study, it was determined that the students who played games for an average of ≥2 hours per day had later bedtime and later wake‐up time, poorer sleep quality, and higher daytime sleepiness. It was found that as the level of game addiction increased, sleep quality decreased, the severity of daytime sleepiness increased, and the wake‐up time shifted to a later time.Practice ImplicationsNurses should develop effective intervention strategies involving technology management and sleep hygiene studies to reduce game ‐playing time of students.
Source: Perspectives in Psychiatric Care - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Authors: Wang Y, Zhao Y, Liu L, Chen Y, Ai D, Yao Y, Jin Y Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this cross-sectional survey is to explore the current state of Internet addiction (IA) in Chinese medical students and its connection with medical students' sleep quality and self-injury behavior. METHODS: Respondents were came from Wannan Medical College, China. The Young's Internet Addiction Test, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Self-Harm Questionnaire were used in this cross-sectional survey. A total of 3,738 medical students were investigated, 1,552 (41.52%) males, 2,186 (58.48%) females. T-test, chi-square ...
Source: Psychiatry Investigation - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatry Investig Source Type: research
Experts recommend monitoring those at risk Related items fromOnMedica Nurseries beat childminders for emotional development CCGs ’ duties for children with disabilities High social media use linked to poor sleep in teens NHS to launch first internet addiction clinic Over-use of mental hospitals for treating children
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
AbstractUniversity students (especially first-years) not only have to cope with their academic curriculum but also issues such as being away from the home environment and living independently for the first time. Those who do not adapt quickly to these new conditions are likely to be susceptible to physical and psychological vulnerabilities. The present study surveyed first-year Bangladeshi undergraduate students to investigate their weight status (i.e., the prevalence of being normal weight, underweight, overweight, and obese) and the prevalence of depression and associated risk factors. A cross-sectional survey was conduc...
Source: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
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Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing AI artificial intelligence augmented reality genetics Health Healthcare nanotechnology Personalized medicine pharma pharmacology robotics virtual reality wearables GC1 Source Type: blogs
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