New Report Assesses Long-Term Health Effects of Antimalarial Drugs Used by U.S. Troops

While there is robust evidence about the concurrent side effects of antimalarial drugs, few studies have examined health effects that persist months or years after the drug was stopped. A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine finds there is currently insufficient evidence to determine whether there is an association between antimalarial use and neurologic and psychiatric outcomes, including anxiety, depression, and the development of symptoms that mimic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Further research is warranted because existing studies are limited in their design. The report outlines strategies for designing and conducting studies that would advance the understanding of possible persistent and latent events associated with antimalarial drugs.Read More
Source: News from the National Academies - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Reported outcomes after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implant include mortality, hospital readmission and severe adverse events. We have less information about patients ’ perceptions of their quality of life (QOL) after hospital discharge. We conducted a prospective two-center international pilot study to assess anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following LVAD implant as bridge to transplant (BTT) or destination therapy (DT).
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: (1105) Source Type: research
Conditions:   Posttraumatic Stress Disorder;   PTSD;   Anxiety;   Depression Interventions:   Device: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS);   Behavioral: Prolonged Exposure Therapy Sponsor:   Medical University of South Carolina Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Most of us have never before experienced enforced self-isolation and lockdown. What can we learn from people who have voluntarily gone into isolation for prolonged periods of time? A group of people who self-isolate regularly are meditators, be it monks spending years in caves or laypersons going to silent retreats. Although there are big differences between meditation retreats and lockdowns, we can learn much from linking the two. When people begin and end meditation retreats, they often have trouble adjusting. Many experience alienation from everyday life, and some struggle with their changed role or idea of self.1 Going...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Coronavirus General Loneliness Relaxation and Meditation COVID-19 Mindfulness pandemic Source Type: news
BACKGROUND: The dimensionality of depression and anxiety instruments have recently been a source of controversy. OBJECTIVES AND DESIGN: In a European-wide sample of patients after Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), we aim to examine the factorial struct...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
It is a stressful time. Many have begun feeling the emotional and psychological effects of being quarantined. People are being told to stay indoors, to limit leaving their home except for necessities and to skip socializing altogether, if possible. Supermarket shelves are empty; toilet paper and hand sanitizer are sold out. Many communities are placing restrictions on where people can go. Buzzwords like “social distancing” and “martial law” are in the news in recent weeks. Hospitals are overcrowded and staff are overworked. Many playgrounds, amusement parks, hotels and beaches have been closed until...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness PTSD coronavirus COVID-19 quarantine traumatic experience Source Type: blogs
These days, we all have to accept the anxiety inherent in living in the time of the coronavirus pandemic and COVID-19. If there was a way to dispel all anxious feelings, I’d tell you, but there isn’t. The one exception might be someone who could summon such a degree of denial that they carry on as if everything was normal. And that, as I’m sure you can see, would prove to be very, very unwise. Anxiety helps us prepare to respond in a more adaptive and healthy way. Some people find it possible to tolerate some degree of discomfort and can manage their anxiety in a healthy manner. Often that’s because...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Health Infectious diseases Mental Health Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Comorbid depressive disorders were observed in almost half of the patients treated in specialized (outpatient) clinics for anxiety disorders. A slower reduction of depressive symptoms predicts worse outcome of the treatment of anxiety. PMID: 32207128 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Tijdschrift voor Psychiatrie - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Tijdschr Psychiatr Source Type: research
As the physical coronavirus pandemic continues to spread, an emotional pandemic is following fast in its wake. When the whole world is going to pieces, it’s awfully hard for the human mind—a fragile thing in the best of times—to cope, and more and more, doctors are reporting the spread of despair, worry and depression among their patients, especially those already suffering from some form of anxiety disorder. Even before COVID-19 hit its shores, the U.S. was a clinically anxious place. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, just over 19% of all American adults will experience at least one a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
ConclusionsThe school-based counselling program was effective in decreasing the PTSD symptoms among children and adolescents after the exposure to war-traumatic events.
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
res Afifi Correctional service employees in Ontario, Canada (n = 1487) began an online survey available from 2017 to 2018 designed to assess the prevalence and correlates of mental health challenges. Participants who provided data for the current study (n = 1032) included provincial staff working in institutional wellness (e.g., nurses) (n = 71), training (e.g., program officers) (n = 26), governance (e.g., wardens) (n = 82), correctional officers (n = 553), administration (e.g., record keeping) (n = 25), and probation officers (n = 144). Correctional officers, workers in institutional administration and governance ...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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