Senator Sanders Is Wrong on Cuban Education and Healthcare

Marian L. Tupy andChelsea FollettThe current frontrunner among the contenders vying to become the Democratic Party ’s presidential candidate, Senator Bernie Sanders (D‑VT), sang Cuba’s praises in a recent60 Minutesinterview on CBS. Senator Sanders applauded Cuba ’s education and healthcare system. Potential Sanders supporters should know that Cuba’s literacy rate and healthcare system are nothing to lionize.First, consider literacy. According to Sanders, “When Fidel Castro came into office, you know what he did? He had a massive literacy program. Is that a bad thing? ” Sanders is surely old enough to know that all communist dictatorships throughout history have ensured that their people were literate—in part so that the people might take in the disinformation printed by government propaganda ministries.Furthermore, a look at the data reveals that all of the progress regarding literacy that happened under communism in Cuba would almost certainly have happened under a different political and economic system. While trustworthy data, defogged of Cuban propaganda, are difficult to come by, the U.S. Department of State tried to do just that by comparing improvements in human well ‐​being in Cuba between the 1950s (the last decade of the hated Batista regime) and 2000.Accordingly, Cuba ’s literacy raterose by 26 percent between 1950/53 and 2000. But literacy rose even more, by 37 percent, in Paraguay. Foo...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Heart rate variability is known to be a good way to assess the function of the autonomic nervous system. (That said, most of the commercially available tools for those who want to measure heart rate variability at home are quite unreliable; it is challenging for a self-experimenter to obtain results that are as useful as those provided by medical equipment used by medical staff). The autonomic nervous system, like all aspects of our biology, is negatively impacted by the progression of aging. The same mechanisms of molecular damage that drive autonomic nervous system aging will be involved in cognitive decline and neurodeg...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: SBRSS is associated with a lower rate of CH than when the procedure is performed bilaterally in a simultaneous fashion. This procedure is associated with the lowest reported rate of CH. PMID: 32250442 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Surgical Technology International - Category: Surgery Tags: Surg Technol Int Source Type: research
Authors: Mitsui R, Hashitani H Abstract Spontaneous rhythmic constrictions known as vasomotion are developed in several microvascular beds in vivo. Vasomotion in arterioles is considered to facilitate blood flow, while venular vasomotion would facilitate tissue metabolite drainage. Mechanisms underlying vasomotion periodically generate synchronous Ca2+ transients in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In visceral organs, mural cells (pericytes and VSMCs) in arterioles, capillaries and venules exhibit synchronous spontaneous Ca2+ transients. Since sympathetic regulation is rather limited in the intra-organ microve...
Source: Journal of Smooth Muscle Research - Category: Research Tags: J Smooth Muscle Res Source Type: research
Conditions:   Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne;   DMD Intervention:   Drug: viltolarsen Sponsor:   NS Pharma, Inc. Available
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Intervention:   Drug: Ataluren Sponsor:   PTC Therapeutics Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy;   Spinal Muscular Atrophy Interventions:   Other: Alert  " AFNOR  3.6 " .;   Other: Alertes " AFNOR 3.6 " et alertes " Guidelines " . Sponsor:   Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
With millions of people across the U.S. and the world battling COVID-19 infections, many of them struggling to breathe, ventilators have become a top priority for the health-care workers trying desperately to keep patients alive. And those machines, which help patients breathe or breathe for them, are in startlingly short supply. For doctors, resorting to a ventilator is an extreme measure, used when a patient’s lungs cannot supply enough oxygen on their own. Ventilators can also give a patient’s body time to rest when breathing is difficult, and allow doctors to more easily remove lung secretions or deliver me...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news
Conditions:   Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy;   Spinal Muscular Atrophy Interventions:   Other: Alert  " AFNOR  3.6 " .;   Other: Alertes " AFNOR 3.6 " et alertes " Guidelines " . Sponsor:   Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conditions:   Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne;   DMD Intervention:   Drug: viltolarsen Sponsor:   NS Pharma, Inc. Available
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Intervention:   Drug: Ataluren Sponsor:   PTC Therapeutics Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
More News: American Health | Brazil Health | Chile Health | Colombia Health | Cuba Health | Dominican Republic Health | Ecuador Health | Education | Government | Haiti Health | Health Management | Mexico Health | Nicaragua Health | Paraguay Health | Politics | Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy | Universities & Medical Training | Venezuela Health