Association of moderate alcohol intake with in vivo amyloid-beta deposition in human brain: A cross-sectional study

by Jee Wook Kim, Min Soo Byun, Dahyun Yi, Jun Ho Lee, Kang Ko, So Yeon Jeon, Bo Kyung Sohn, Jun-Young Lee, Yu Kyeong Kim, Seong A Shin, Chul-Ho Sohn, Dong Young Lee, for the KBASE Research Group BackgroundAn emerging body of literature has indicated that moderate alcohol intake may be protective against Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia. However, little information is available regarding whether moderate alcohol intake is related to reductions in amyloid-beta (A β) deposition, or is protective via amyloid-independent mechanisms in the living human brain. Here we examined the associations of moderate alcohol intake with in vivo AD pathologies, including cerebral Aβ deposition, neurodegeneration of AD-signature regions, and cerebral white matter hyperintens ities (WMHs) in the living human brain. Methods and findingsThe present study was part of the Korean Brain Aging Study for Early Diagnosis and Prediction of Alzheimer ’s Disease (KBASE), an ongoing prospective cohort study that started in 2014. As of November 2016, 414 community-dwelling individuals with neither dementia nor alcohol-related disorders (280 cognitively normal [CN] individuals and 134 individuals with mild cognitive impairment [MCI]) between 56 an d 90 years of age (mean age 70.9 years ± standard deviation 7.8; male,n [%] = 180 [43.5]) were recruited from 4 sites (i.e., 2 university hospitals and 2 public centers for dementia prevention and management) around Seoul, South Korea. All the par...
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research

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AbstractChanges in neurovascular coupling are associated with both Alzheimer ’s disease and vascular dementia in later life, but this may be confounded by cerebrovascular risk. We hypothesized that hemodynamic latency would be associated with reduced cognitive functioning across the lifespan, holding constant demographic and cerebrovascular risk. In 387 adults aged 18–85 (mean = 48.82), dynamic causal modeling was used to estimate the hemodynamic response function in the left and right V1 and V3-ventral regions of the visual cortex in response to a simple checkerboard block design stimulus with mi...
Source: Anatomy and Embryology - Category: Anatomy Source Type: research
Conclusions: In this study, we observed in middle- and old-aged individuals with neither dementia nor alcohol-related disorders that moderate lifetime alcohol intake was associated with lower cerebral AB deposition compared to a lifetime history of not drinking. Moderate lifetime alcohol intake may have a beneficial influence on AD by reducing pathological amyloid deposition rather than amyloid-independent neurodegeneration or cerebrovascular injury. The Study in Context: Report: 35% of worldwide dementia cases could be prevented by modifying these 9 modifiable risk factors Study: Drinking up to 5–8 glasses of wine...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Alzheimer-disease Alzheimers beer beta amyloid deposits brain protein dementia hard liquor mental acuity moderate drinking MRI neurodegeneration PET wine Source Type: blogs
Authors: Verny M, Duyckaerts C Abstract Several disorders are usually involved in the cognitive deficit of the oldest old. Alzheimer disease is the commonest. It is usually characterized by progressive memory impairment - neocortical symptoms occurring much later in the course of the disease. Alzheimer disease should not be considered any more as the single cause of a cognitive deficit in a very old patient. Vascular alterations, possibly causing microinfarcts, are commonly associated, especially in cerebral amyloid angiopathy. A slowly progressive memory deficit with negative CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease ...
Source: Revue Neurologique - Category: Neurology Tags: Rev Neurol (Paris) Source Type: research
Compared with abstainers, those who drank up to 13 standard drinks a week had a 66 percent lower rate of beta amyloid deposits in their brains.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcoholic Beverages Alzheimer ' s Disease Dementia Source Type: news
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
DiscussionMR found robust evidence of a causal association between alcohol consumption and an earlier AAOS, but not alcohol intake and LOAD risk. The protective effect of alcohol dependence is potentially due to survivor bias.
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
What exactly is psychosis? What happens in the brain of a person with schizophrenia who is hallucinating? Schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers shares her personal hallucinations and delusions and Dr. Joseph Goldberg, who specializes in researching what goes on in the brain when someone is experiencing psychosis, joins to break down how the brain functions during psychotic episodes. Host Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, and co-host Gabe Howard delve into these intense subjects in this episode of Inside Schizophrenia.  Highlights from “Psychosis in Schizophrenia” Episode [02:13]  Rachel, do...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Active psychosis Delusions Delusions Hallucinations Living with Schizoprenia Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychology psychotic Psychotic Break Source Type: blogs
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that nondependent alcohol drinking exacerbates the onset and magnitude of AD-like neural and behavioral pathology. We first evaluated the impact of voluntary 24-h, two-bottle choice home-cage alcohol drinking on the prefrontal cortex and amygdala neuroproteome in C57BL/6J mice and found a striking association between alcohol drinking and AD-like pathology. Bioinformatics identified the AD-associated proteins MAPT (Tau), amyloid beta precursor protein (APP), and presenilin-1 (PSEN-1) as the main modulators of alcohol-sensitive protein networks that included AD-related proteins ...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Funding Opportunity RFA-AA-20-006 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The goal of this FOA is to support basic and clinical research on the influence of alcohol on susceptibility and progression of Alzheimers disease and its related dementias. Recent longitudinal studies have provided strong evidence that alcohol use disorder is associated with the high risk of all types of dementias, and frequent heavy drinking increases risk of both Alzheimers disease and vascular dementia. Even moderate alcohol consumption may be a risk factor for adverse brain outcomes and cognitive decline. Although these studies link heavy ...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
This study was designed to test the hypothesis that nondependent alcohol drinking exacerbates the onset and magnitude of AD-like neural and behavioral pathology. We first evaluated the impact of voluntary 24-h, two-bottle choice home-cage alcohol drinking on the prefrontal cortex and amygdala neuroproteome in C57BL/6J mice and found a striking association between alcohol drinking and AD-like pathology. Bioinformatics identified the AD-associated proteins MAPT (Tau), amyloid beta precursor protein (APP), and presenilin-1 (PSEN-1) as the main modulators of alcohol-sensitive protein networks that included AD-related proteins ...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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