Moral injury: the pandemic for physicians - Frezza Md E.

We need a safety net for physicians, private psychological support reportable to no one. Otherwise we will continue to see physician burnout and suicide increase. Language: en...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

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It is well known that physicians are more likely to screen positive for depression and have higher rates of suicide than their counterparts in the general population. But how is this fact exacerbated by the global pandemic of fear, anxiety, and mounting death tolls known as COVID-19? For starters, health care workers are at the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more.
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Apr 1 2020 (IPS) The experience and interpretation of the Coronavirus pandemic oscillates between the personal and the general spheres. The official discourse and measures taken by authorities have a direct impact on our lives, change our daily existence and foster worries for the future. A dark cloud of uncertainty hovers above us. What do decision makers know? What can they do? What can we do? Many of us are secluded in our own homes, others in wards or hospitals, or even alone and far away from the ones they love: All you who sleep tonight Far from the ones you love, No hands to left or ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
For most physicians, the needs of the individual patient in their office or clinic is the focus of their attention. But outside the setting of that single patient encounter is a larger community of patients in need, their families, and individuals who may later need care.Even in the best of times there may be a tension between a physician ’s ethical obligations to the individual patient and to the broader public. During a global pandemic such as COVID-19, that tension has been heightened and may come into play in many clinical scenarios, according to Rebecca Brendel, M.D., J.D., chair of the APA Committee on Ethics. ...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: COVID-19 ethics hoarding medications prescriptions public health Rebecca Brendel social distancing Source Type: research
Twilight Zone time, not sure how long the unofficial quarantine has been going on in my neck of the woods, nor do I know how long it will last. As of a day or so ago, Tom Wolf, governor of my home state of Pennsylvania, declared that everyone is expected to remain at home, unless they need to go to the supermarket, pharmacy, medical appointment or essential workplace. As a psychotherapist, I am in that category. Our group practice office which provides counseling and medication management will remain active with the condition that we use telehealth to serve our clients. A short learning curve, far easier than I anticipate...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Personal coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic quarantine Source Type: blogs
APA todaypraised Congress for approving a $2 trillion stimulus aid package to provide fiscal relief for Americans and businesses in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. The legislation, known as the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), includes many provisions supported by APA that will enable psychiatrists and mental health care professionals to better respond to the pandemic. The relief package will now go to President Donald Trump, where he is expected to sign.“You can’t have a healthy economy without healthy people—and that includes mental health,” said APA President Bru...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: 42 CFR Part II and Economic Security Act Bruce Schwartz CARES Act Congress coronavirus Coronavirus Aid COVID-19 Medicare Relief samhsa Saul Levin stimulus package substance use disorders telehealth Source Type: research
Stress caused by uncertainty can be paralyzing. The information we are getting about the coronavirus seems to be changing by the hour — creating unprecedented uncertainty. There is a good reason your nerves are jangle, or you are feeling unsettled or anxious. Uncertainty is perceived as unsafe and potentially painful. Whether the situation is predictably positive or predictably negative, your brain prefers something familiar to something unfamiliar. Under stress, our brains depend on instinct rather than rational thought because the part of the brain responsible for critical thinking is busy dealing with the psycholo...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Stress Management uncertainty Source Type: blogs
Source: Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health. Published: 3/25/2020. The current need for social distancing and isolation related to the COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated a quick expansion of the provision of mental health services via remote platforms. This three-page document provides tips for evaluating and treating suicidal individuals remotely via telehealth. (PDF)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads around the world, we are starting to see the first waves of epidemiological data1,2 and know that it disproportionately impacts older adults3. However, with this still being a new and rapidly evolving global crisis, there is currently very little known about its broader impact on mental health. Clinicians are gaining early experiences around a range of issues that are highly relevant to the mental health care of older adults4 in the context of COVID-19. Retrospective studies of the 2003 SARS epidemic found that rates of suicide among older adults spiked during the period of the epidemic5.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
(ATLANTA) — On a chaotic flight home, some passengers who had been stranded for days aboard a cruise ship after being exposed to the coronavirus suffered breathing problems, many coughed and several fainted with no food or medical personnel provided, travelers said Friday “It was a suicide mission,” said passenger Jenny Harrell, of Fredericksburg, Virginia. “It was a mass triage with absolutely no direction and the crew going, ‘What should we do now?’” Decisions were left up to the passengers, said Harrell, who had some emergency medical training in the past and helped a physician ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
If you were to sum up the overall health of a nation in one single number, what would that be? At the top of the list, you would likely find average life expectancy — the total number of years, on average, that a person in a country can expect to live. Wars, famine, and economic crises are expected to lower life expectancy. Breakthroughs in science, strong economies, and behaviors like eating a healthy diet, exercising, and avoiding tobacco typically raise average life expectancy. An amazing rise, a surprising fall Between 1959 and 2014, the United States experienced an unprecedented increase in life expectancy, whic...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Health Health care disparities Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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