Report: South African State Hospitals ‘Forcibly’ Sterilized Women With HIV

(Bloomberg) — State hospitals in South Africa have sterilized some pregnant HIV-positive women without their consent, according to an investigation by the government’s Commission for Gender Equality. The investigation was prompted by a 2015 complaint by the non-profit Women’s Legal Centre, which documented 48 cases where women were allegedly either forced or coerced into agreeing to the procedure while giving birth. South Africa has the biggest HIV epidemic in the world, with a prevalence rate of 13% and about 7.7 million people living with the virus that causes AIDS. The impact of the epidemic on family structures and life expectancy has led to widespread stigmatization of those who are affected by the virus. Medical staff breached their duty of care and subjected the women to inhumane treatment, the Commission for Gender Equality said in a 57-page report Tuesday. Doctors and nurses told some of the HIV-positive women that they should not be having children and that they would die if they didn’t get sterilized following delivery. Many agreed to the procedure by signing forms they didn’t understand. When one of the women asked what the forms were for, her concerns were dismissed by a nurse, according to an affidavit. “You HIV people don’t ask questions when you make babies. Why are you asking questions now?” the report quoted a nurse as saying. “You must be closed up because you HIV people like making babies and it just a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized HIV onetime South Africa Source Type: news

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Is it ever OK to joke about mental illness or suicide? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa welcome Frank King, a comedian who’s turned his struggles with major depression and suicidal thinking into comedic material. What do you think? Is joking about suicide too heavy? Or is humor a good coping mechanism? Join us for an in-depth discussion on gallows humor. (Transcript Available Below) Subscribe to Our Show! And Please Remember to Rate &Review Us!   Guest Information for ‘Frank King — Joking and Suicide’ Podcast Episode Frank King, Suicide Prevention speaker and Trainer w...
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Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The MAReport: the Summer/Fall 2018 issue of the MAReport newsletter is now available! This quarter, Executive Director Kate Flewelling wrote about how the National Library of Medicine and National Network of Libraries of Medicine are responding to the opioid crisis, including details on a new class that will be offered for the first time on November 28. National Network of Libraries of Medicine News Funding Applications Due: NNLM MAR has funding available for two grants of $19,000. Libraries, community-based organizations, ...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
July 23, 2018A simple procedure is lowering the risk for thousands of couples in  Tanzania.Twenty-one-year-old Khadija Butemi was doing her morning chores when she heard an announcement through a loudspeaker passing by on the nearby country road.There was a campaign going on, it said, for men who wanted to undergo voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). She immediately thought of her husband, a 22-year-old fisherman, who was down by the lake fishing.The couple lives with their two-year-old daughter in Nansio, a remote village on the island of Ukerewe, Tanzania. VMMC isn ’t routinely offered in the area, and ...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
By Susan Blumenthal, M.D. and Alexandrea Adams The recent commemoration of National Women’s Health Week provided an important time to mark the progress that has been made in advancing women’s health over the past two decades and to highlight what more needs to be done to achieve women’s health equity in America. Historically, women have experienced discrimination in health care despite making 80 percent of health care decisions for their families, using more medical services than men, and suffering greater disability from chronic disease. Before the mid 1990’s, women were often excluded as subjects ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Anaesthetics Cardiology Education Emergency Medicine Haematology Intensive Care critical care literature R&R in the FASTLANE recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs
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Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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