Evaluation of a Novel High-Definition PCR Multiplex Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Human Clinical Specimens Parasitology

The incidence of tick-borne infections in the United States has risen significantly in the past decade. Ticks can transmit a variety of pathogens, including bacteria, protozoa, and viruses, that can cause serious illnesses. Therefore, the use of rapid, sensitive, and specific multiplex tests is important to identify the pathogen(s) in the acute phase and determine appropriate treatment to minimize the severity of the disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ChromaCode’s research use only (RUO) nine-target high-definition PCR (HDPCR) tick-borne pathogen (TBP) panel using 379 retrospective, remnant whole-blood and synovial fluid specimens previously submitted to Associated Regional and University Pathologists (ARUP) Laboratories and tested by clinically validated real-time PCR assays for Ehrlichia spp., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia spp., or Lyme Borrelia spp. The performance characteristics evaluated included positive percent agreement (PPA) and negative percent agreement (NPA) with the ARUP laboratory-developed tests (LDTs). All tested targets had an initial PPA greater than 97.0%, except Ehrlichia ewingii, with a PPA of 88.9%. The NPAs for all targets were between 98.8% and 100%. The TBP panel detected three coinfections, with two of Babesia microti and A. phagocytophilum and one of B. microti and E. chaffeensis, which were confirmed by the LDTs. There were 16 samples with discordant results compared to the LDT results, five of which were resolved by rep...
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Parasitology Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 26 February 2020Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Seunghee Lee, Hyunkyoung Lee, Jung-Won Park, Soon-Seek Yoon, Hyun-Ji Seo, Jinhyeong Noh, Mi-Sun Yoo, Keun-Ho Kim, Yeojin Park, Yun Sang Cho, Byung Jae So
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Abstract Ixodes scapularis is currently known to transmit 7 pathogens responsible for Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, tick-borne relapsing fever, ehrlichiosis, and Powassan encephalitis. Ixodes scapularis can also be colonized by endosymbiotic bacteria including those in the genus of Rickettsia. We screened 459 I. scapularis ticks submitted to the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station Tick Testing Laboratory with the objectives to (1) examine differences in infection prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, and Borrelia miyamotoi, (2) evaluate whether prevalence...
Source: The Journal of Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: J Parasitol Source Type: research
This study also revealed the presence of the close ecological and evolutionary relationships between two important vector ticks, Hyalomma marginatum and Hy. aegyptium and determined genetic variations (distinct phylogenetic divergences inside the main clades) in some pathogenic SFG rickettsiae that are found in these ticks. Additionally, the presence of two Babesia species described very recently in hares with unknown vectors, namely Babesia sp. tavsan1 and Babesia sp. tavsan2, were detected for the first time in ticks. Finally, two unnamed Hepatozoon spp. were detected in Haemaphysalis ticks and their phylogenetic positio...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 6 December 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Hein Sprong, Sander Moonen, Sipke E. van Wieren, Tim R. HofmeesterAbstractCattle grazing has been suggested to reduce the risk for Lyme borreliosis by decreasing the density of questing Ixodes ricinus infected with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. We tested the hypotheses that cattle grazing used in woodland management decreases the density of questing I. ricinus, and that it decreases the nympal infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato. We further expected the nympal infection prevalence of tick-borne pathogens that ...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the potential danger from the inadvertent introduction of novel disease pathogens and vectors. Awareness of co-infections and Dermacentor reticulatus-related pathogens needs to be increased. PMID: 31694625 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: BMC Vet Res Source Type: research
This study demonstrates the effect of only simultaneous infection by B. burgdorferi and B. microti on each pathogen, immune response and on disease manifestations with respect to infection by the spirochete and the parasite. In our future studies, we will examine the overall effects of sequential infection by these pathogens on host immune responses and disease outcomes.
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 June 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Benjamin A. Tonelli, Donald C. DearbornAbstractIxodes scapularis is responsible for the transmission of a variety of pathogens in North America, including Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti. Songbirds have previously been described as agents of tick dispersal, and a combination of empirical data and modeling efforts have implicated songbirds in the range expansion of I. scapularis northward into Canada during spring bird migration. The role of fall bird migration has received comparat...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
In this study, we applied complementary in silico approaches to modeling how Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection modulates tick vector regulome. This proof-of-concept research provided support for the use of network analysis in the study of regulome response to infection, resulting in new information on tick-pathogen interactions and potential targets for developing interventions for the control of tick infestations and pathogen transmission. Deciphering the precise nature of circuits that shape the tick regulome in response to pathogen infection is an area of research that in the future will advance our knowledge of tick-...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study provides insight into the microbial diversity of I. scapularis in New York State and Connecticut.
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Abstract Climate warming and other environmental changes have contributed to the expansion of the range of several tick species into higher latitudes in North America. As temperatures increase in Canada, the environment becomes more suitable for ticks and the season suitable for tick activity lengthens, so tick-borne diseases are likely to become more common in Canada. In addition to Lyme disease, four other tick-borne diseases (TBDs) have started to emerge and are likely to increase: Anaplasmosis; Babesiosis; Powassan virus; and Borrelia miyamotoi disease. Increased temperature increases the survival and activity...
Source: Can Commun Dis Rep - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Can Commun Dis Rep Source Type: research
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