The Potential Benefits of Deferred Payment for a Hypothetical Gene Therapy for Congestive Heart Failure: A Cost-Consequence Analysis

ConclusionsA DPM may result in faster access to CHF gene therapy and may thus reduce hospital admissions and mortality in contrast to a status quo payment with the same budget constraint. Although the financial benefits of a DPM in CHF gene therapy are limited, it is possible that deferred payments will show greater promise for treatments with higher cost offsets.
Source: Applied Health Economics and Health Policy - Category: Health Management Source Type: research

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Discussion of the Evolutionary Genetics of Aging Thymic Involution Contributes to Immunosenescence and Inflammaging The Potential for Exosome Therapies to Treat Sarcopenia Correlations of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Epigenetic Age Measures Evidence for PASK Deficiency to Reduce the Impact of Aging in Mice The Aging Retina, a Mirror of the Aging Brain Evidence for Loss of Capillary Density to be Important in Heart Disease Aspects of Immune System Aging Proceed More Rapidly in Men Deacetylation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Way to Control Chronic Inflammation Transplantation of Senescent Cells is an ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Telomerase gene therapy is considered in some quarters to be a viable treatment for aging. Telomeres are the caps of repeated DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes. They are an important part of the mechanism limiting the number of times that somatic cells in the body can divide, the Hayflick limit. A little telomere length is lost with each cell division, and short telomeres trigger cellular senescence or programmed cell death, halting replication. Stem cell populations use telomerase to lengthen their telomeres and thus self-renew to provide a continual supply of new somatic daughter cells with long telomeres to repla...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study featured two independent experiments. The first established the safety of administering a therapeutic gene delivery vector, BNP116, created from an inactivated virus over three months, into 48 pigs without heart failure through the coronary arteries via catheterization using echocardiography. The second experiment examined the efficacy of the treatment in 13 pigs with severe heart failure induced by mitral regurgitation. Six pigs received the gene and 7 received a saline solution. The researchers determined that the gene therapy was safe and significantly reversed heart failure by 25 percent in the left v...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study featured two independent experiments. The first established the safety of administering a therapeutic gene delivery vector, BNP116, created from an inactivated virus over three months, into 48 pigs without heart failure through the coronary arteries via catheterization using echocardiography. The second experiment examined the efficacy of the treatment in 13 pigs with severe heart failure induced by mitral regurgitation. Six pigs received the gene and 7 received a saline solution. The researchers determined that the gene therapy was safe and significantly reversed heart failure by 25 percent in the left v...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
This report captures the state of the research community in a nutshell: progress in the sense that ever more scientists are willing to make the treatment of aging the explicit goal of their research, but, unfortunately, there is still a long way to go in improving the nature of that research. It is still near entirely made up of projects that cannot possibly produce a robust and large impact on human life span. The only course of action likely to extend life by decades in the near future is implementation of the SENS vision for rejuvenation therapies - to repair the molecular damage that causes aging. Everything else on th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Wu P, Zhai Y, Li D Abstract Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a widespread disease that has a negative impact on health, worldwide. Despite advances in therapies, morbidity, mortality and hospital discharges due to CHF remain high. Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of CHF and the development of gene transfer technology have made gene therapy a realistic potential therapeutic method for CHF. Among the various potential targets, sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a), which is an important protein in the regulation of Ca2+ cycling, has piqued the interest of man...
Source: Histology and Histopathology - Category: Cytology Tags: Histol Histopathol Source Type: research
Congestive heart failure is one of the leading causes of disability in long-term survivors of cancer. The anthracycline antibiotic doxorubicin (DOX) is used to treat a variety of cancers, but its utility is limited by its cumulative cardiotoxicity. As advances in cancer treatment have decreased cancer mortality, DOX-induced cardiomyopathy has...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
A Chapel Hill biotech heard good news from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday. The regulatory body accepted an investigational new drug (IND) application from NanoCor Therapeutics, Inc. relating to Carfostin, an experimental cardiac gene therapy in development for the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF). Simply accepting the application is still a long way from approving a finished drug, of course, but is seen as an important milestone for drug developers. Now, NanoCor may…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
Researchers here demonstrate that using gene therapy to introduce a modified calcium receptor into the heart can improve the calcium signaling that drives the heartbeat, and that the effects are measurable even for a small uptake of the new receptor in heart cells. In the context of heart disease and degenerative aging of the heart, this approach could partially compensate for progressive failure of function in the organ, though it doesn't fix any of the underlying cell and tissue damage, or the prior remodeling of the heart caused by arterial stiffening and consequent hypertension. Researchers have engineered new calcium...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
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