FDA approves Opsumit to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Opsumit (macitentan), a new drug to treat adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a chronic, progressive and debilitating disease that can lead to death or the need for lung transplantation.
Source: Food and Drug Administration - Category: American Health Source Type: news

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In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The added value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in the follow-up of patients with stable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains undefined.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Science Source Type: research
Right ventricular failure (RVF) is still associated with an increased mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) or congenital heart disease. Transition from right ventricular dysfunction to RVF is not predictable and has not been well understood so far. Several studies in rodents and in piglets showed that impairment of capillary density (CD) in the right ventricle (RV) is associated with right ventricular failure (1, 2). Some evidence suggested that the RV of patients with Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES) has remarkable adaptive capacities to high pulmonary pressures (3), leading to a longer survival in these patien...
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Research Correspondence Source Type: research
Risk stratification of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is in the center of health care interests and has recently been addressed by numerous studies that are based on large international PH registries (1-5). Less evidence exists for Group 3 PH (6). Therefore, Rose et al, in their paper in this issue of JHLT, are to be commended on their efforts to identify predictors of survival in Group 3 PH patients, to characterize the clinical phenotypes and survival differences between patients with mild and severe Group 3 PH, and to evaluate how the etiology of lung disease impacts patient profiles and survival.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
ConclusionsVarious biomarkers are associated with the event-free survival in adults with PH. However, risk stratification exclusively based on single or a combination of biomarkers seems not superior to existing risk scores.
Source: American Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and rapidly progressive disease, characterized by remodeling and vasoconstriction of the pulmonary vasculature, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance. PAH continues to be life-threatening, with high mortality despite advances in therapy. Current guidelines support the use of combination therapies that target the endothelin, nitric-oxide, and prostacyclin pathways. However, prostacyclin therapy has long been considered the gold standard for high risk patients, and intravenous (IV) prostacyclin therapy is the only medication shown to improve survival in PAH.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Research Correspondence Source Type: research
Despite the numerous innovations in all diagnostic and treatment aspects of congenital heart disease, the management of pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS), primary or postoperative, continues to be perplexing and 1-2 year survival of patients with progressive PVS seems to have stubbornly plateaued at a low range of 50-60%.1-4 Various medical, percutaneous and surgical treatment modalities for PVS have been described. Nonetheless, all those options continue to be associated with inferior outcomes due to residual lesions, recurrent stenosis secondary to disease progression in the same or other pulmonary veins, development of pulm...
Source: Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Congenital – Editorial Commentary Source Type: research
Introduction: Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune disease with ongoing high disease related mortality. Three randomized controlled trials proofed efficacy of autologous stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) in patients with severe SSc and superiority over the standard cyclophosphamide pulse therapy. Treatment related mortality is a major point of criticism and different treatment regimen are used in different centers.Methods: This prospective, open, multi-center, non-interventional study of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) analyzed data for consecutive aHSCT performed in SSc. Every ce...
Source: Blood - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 731. Clinical Autologous Transplantation: Results: Poster II Source Type: research
In the randomized, double-blind, event-driven AMBITION study, initial combination therapy with ambrisentan and tadalafil was associated with a 50% reduction in risk of clinical failure (first occurrence of all-cause death, hospitalization for worsening pulmonary arterial hypertension [PAH], disease progression, or unsatisfactory long-term clinical response) vs pooled monotherapy. These results were primarily driven by a reduction in PAH-related hospitalization in the combination therapy group, although a significant effect was not observed in a post-hoc analysis of all-cause hospitalization.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL CLINICAL SCIENCE Source Type: research
In the randomized, double-blind, event-driven AMBITION study, initial combination therapy with ambrisentan and tadalafil was associated with a 50% reduction in risk of clinical failure (first occurrence of all-cause death, hospitalization for worsening pulmonary arterial hypertension [PAH], disease progression, or unsatisfactory long-term clinical response) versus pooled monotherapy. These results were primarily driven by a reduction in PAH-related hospitalization in the combination therapy group, though a significant effect was not observed in a post-hoc analysis of all-cause hospitalization.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Science Source Type: research
More News: American Health | Food and Drug Administration (FDA) | Hypertension | Lung Transplant | Transplants