Global burden of respiratory infections associated with seasonal influenza in children under 5 years in 2018: a systematic review and modelling study

Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: The Lancet Global HealthAuthor(s): Xin Wang, You Li, Katherine L O'Brien, Shabir A Madhi, Marc-Alain Widdowson, Peter Byass, Saad B Omer, Qalab Abbas, Asad Ali, Alberta Amu, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, Quique Bassat, W Abdullah Brooks, Sandra S Chaves, Alexandria Chung, Cheryl Cohen, Marcela Echavarria, Rodrigo A Fasce, Angela Gentile, Aubree GordonSummaryBackgroundSeasonal influenza virus is a common cause of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in young children. In 2008, we estimated that 20 million influenza-virus-associated ALRI and 1 million influenza-virus-associated severe ALRI occurred in children under 5 years globally. Despite this substantial burden, only a few low-income and middle-income countries have adopted routine influenza vaccination policies for children and, where present, these have achieved only low or unknown levels of vaccine uptake. Moreover, the influenza burden might have changed due to the emergence and circulation of influenza A/H1N1pdm09. We aimed to incorporate new data to update estimates of the global number of cases, hospital admissions, and mortality from influenza-virus-associated respiratory infections in children under 5 years in 2018.MethodsWe estimated the regional and global burden of influenza-associated respiratory infections in children under 5 years from a systematic review of 100 studies published between Jan 1, 1995, and Dec 31, 2018, and a further 57 high-quality un...
Source: The Lancet Global Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

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Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Quarantines Influenza Ventilators (Medical) Deaths (Fatalities) Tests (Medical) Epidemics Vaccination and Immunization SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) United States Politics and Government Pneumonia F Source Type: news
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: BMC Public Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
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Source: Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol Source Type: research
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This article is republished from The Conversation. Read the original article. The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Ignacio López-Goñi is microbiologist and works in University of Navarra (Spain). The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 health History ideas Source Type: news
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Cold and Flu Infectious diseases Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
RARITAN, NJ, February 10, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson announced today the submission of a supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking approval of DARZALEX® (daratumumab) in combination with Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) and dexamethasone (DKd) for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. The sBLA is supported by results from the Phase 3 CANDOR study, which compared treatment with DKd to carfilzomib and dexamethasone (Kd) in patients with multiple myeloma who relapsed after one to three prior lines of therapy. “Wh...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
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