Here ’s How Effective the CDC Says the Flu Vaccine Has Been for Kids This Season

(NEW YORK) — It may end up being a bad flu season for kids, but early signs suggest the vaccine is working OK. The vaccine has been more than 50% effective in preventing flu illness severe enough to send a child to the doctor’s office, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. Health experts consider that pretty good. The vaccines are made each year to protect against three or four different kinds of flu virus. The ingredients are based on predictions of what strains will make people sick the following winter. It doesn’t always work out. This flu season has featured two waves, each dominated by a different virus. Both of those flu bugs are considered dangerous to children, but tend not to be as dangerous to the elderly. Health officials grew worried when it became clear that the vaccine didn’t match the Type B flu strain that ended up causing most early season illnesses. But the CDC estimates that the vaccine has been about 50% effective against that strain in children. And the vaccine has been about 55% effective among kids against the Type A strain that has caused a second wave of flu illnesses. “These estimates are reassuring,” said the CDC’s Brendan Flannery, who oversees the agency’s system for evaluating flu vaccine effectiveness. Vaccines against many infectious diseases aren’t considered successful unless they are at least 90% effective. But flu is particularly challenging, partly because ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized influenza onetime Source Type: news

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Authors: Valentino S, Suit L Abstract Background: The community college student is not currently armed with the resources or prevention information regarding influenza. Less than twenty percent of the college population receives influenza immunization annually.Purpose: The purpose of the project was to evaluate if an evidenced-based influenza and vaccine education intervention will affect nursing students' intent to vaccinate for influenza by increasing knowledge of the influenza vaccine using Zingg and Siegrist's Knowledge Scale.Methods: Participants were recruited voluntarily from their attendance at orientation ...
Source: Journal of Community Health Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: J Community Health Nurs Source Type: research
AbstractThe use of the nanocapsulated adjuvant Sapomax increased the expression of innate immunity genes (H2Q10, Ddx58, Tyk2, Tlr3, Tlr7, and TNF) responsible for the primary recognition of influenza virus, i.e., those belonging to the RLR and TLR families; genes involved in stimulating the production of type I and III IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines; and Th1 and Th2 cellular immunity genes (Ccr4, Ccr5, IFN γ, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10) responsible for triggering regulatory immune mechanisms in the cell. The high immunological activity of the plant-derived nanocapsulated adjuvant Sapomax may be used to enhance the efficacy of vaccines.
Source: Archives of Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
The reassortant vaccine strain of live attenuated influenza vaccine inherits temperature sensitivity and areactogenicity from cold-adapted attenuated master donor virus. In Russia, B/ USSR/60/69 master donor virus (B60) is currently in use for the preparation of live attenuated type B influenza vaccine candidates. Trivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine based on A/ Leningrad/134/17/57 and B60 are licensed for the use in Russia for single dose vaccination of adults and children over 3 years. B/Leningrad/14/17/55 (B14) cold-adapted virus is a backup master donor virus for live attenuated type B influenza vaccine. Accordi...
Source: Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Authors: Schlipköter U, Flahault A Abstract The past two centuries have seen enormous achievements in control of infectious diseases, previously the leading cause of death, in large measure due to sanitation and food safety, vaccines, antibiotics and improved nutrition. This has led people to put their faith in the notion that medical science would succeed in overcoming the remaining obstacles. Vaccination has eradicated smallpox, nearly eradicated poliomyelitis and greatly reduced many other highly dangerous infections such as diphtheria, tetanus and measles. New diseases such as HIV and new forms of influenz...
Source: Public Health Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rev Source Type: research
The risks, so far, seem no greater than for anyone else, but the research is thin and only applies to later stage of pregnancy.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Women and Girls Pregnancy and Childbirth Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Babies and Infants Quarantines Epidemics Swine Influenza Vaccination and Immunization SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) Breastfeeding American College of Obstetric Source Type: news
Authors: Park SH, Lee MS, Kim SR, Kwak YG Abstract BACKGROUND: Healthcare personnel (HCP) are at risk of being exposed to or transmitting infections in hospitals, and vaccination against vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) is a well-known preventive strategy. Vaccination against influenza, hepatitis B virus, measles-mumps-rubella, varicella, and pertussis is recommended for HCP. However, there is no information on the current status of hospitals' vaccination policies for HCP in Korea. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide survey on hospital vaccination policies and barriers to implementing recommended vaccination ...
Source: Journal of Korean Medical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
Purpose of review Mass gathering events bring people from across all continents increasing the risk of spread of aerosol transmissible respiratory tract infections. Respiratory tract infections for instance in pilgrims attending the world's largest recurring annual pilgrimage, the Hajj are common. We review recent literature on viral and bacterial infectious diseases with special focus on the Hajj. Recent findings The prevalence of bacterial and viral infections continue to increase, because of the acquisition of rhinovirus, coronaviruses (229E, HKU1, OC43), influenza A H1N1, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus infl...
Source: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: INFECTIOUS DISEASES: Edited by Michael S. Niederman and Alimuddin Zumla Source Type: research
Influenza vaccine manufacturers traditionally use egg-derived candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) to produce high-yield influenza viruses for seasonal or pandemic vaccines; however, these egg-derived CVVs need an...
Source: Journal of Biomedical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Last year, when I visited the town of Beni, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), people did not shake hands. Bottles of disinfectant and buckets of chlorinated water were at the entrance of every business. Misinformation spread across social networks and on news-sites, and treatment centers in the northeastern province of North Kivu were being attacked by armed militias. At the time, Beni was one of the centers of a devastating Ebola outbreak, the second most deadly in world history. According to the World Health Organization, almost 3,500 people were sickened by the virus, and more than 2,000 died, a case fatali...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Please don't get me wrong. I've seen other people try to put our present crisis in context, or discuss the costs vs. the benefits of certain actions, and be widely condemned for insensitivity or even sociopathy. I remember after the 9/11 attack, when people who tried to explain the motivations or sociological origins of Al Qaeda and similar movements faced the same sort of criticism. You weren't allowed to think about the problem, people weren't ready for any sort of moral confusion. In what I am about to say, I am not arguing against saving lives, on the contrary. I'm just trying to explain something about where we are in...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
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