Artificial Glycoproteins as a Scaffold for Targeted Drug Therapy

To gain a better understanding of the factors that govern in vivo cellular recognition, artificial glycoproteins are created as biomimetic probes to study the influence of specific glycan assemblies to biodistribution. The principle aim of this Review is to present pioneering research that has driven artificial glycoprotein ‐based targeting and subsequent adaptations with potential therapeutic applications. AbstractAkin to a cellular “fingerprint,” the glycocalyx is a glycan‐enriched cellular coating that plays a crucial role in mediating cell‐to‐cell interactions. To gain a better understanding of the factors that govern in vivo recognition, artificial glycoproteins were initially created to probe changes made to the accumulation and biodistribution of specific glycan assemblies through biomimicry. As a result, the organ‐specific accumulation for a variety of glycoproteins decorated with simple and/or complex glycans was identified. Additionally, binding trends with regard to cancer cell selectivity were also investigated. To exploit the knowledge gained from these studies, numerous groups thus became engaged in developing targeted drug methodologies based on the use of artificial glycoproteins. This has either been done through adopting the glycoprotein scaffold as a drug carrier, or to directly glycosy late therapeutic proteins/enzymes to localize their biological activity. The principle aim of this Review is to present the foundational research that ...
Source: Small - Category: Nanotechnology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research

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There is an urgent need to share expertise and offer emergency guidance for breast radiation therapy (RT) during the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic. As per the World Health Organisation (WHO) statement, our aim and obligation should be “to stop, contain, control, delay and reduce the impact of this virus at every opportunity”. In our roles as healthcare professionals and/or breast cancer experts this translates to minimising exposure of our patients to COVID-19 without compromising oncological outcome.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Purpose: The availability of novel imaging modalities (NIM) in prostate cancer (PCa) has overtaken the evidence informing their use. The recent EORTC consensus statement on modern imaging recognises the need for large-scale clinical trials of novel imaging [1]. The UK environment is well placed to conduct such trials; the NCRI prostate cancer CSG wished to benchmark current UK imaging availability and practice to inform future national trials.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Purpose: The role of pelvic nodal irradiation in prostate cancer remains controversial. Nevertheless, many high-risk patients are treated with prostate and pelvis radiotherapy in addition to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) [1]. A recent retrospective study [2] and data from the UK Stampede control arm [3] suggest that radiotherapy may be of benefit to node positive patients. The aim of our study was to document outcomes in patients with node positive prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal radiotherapy in a UK cancer centre.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Purpose: Relapsed or progressive prostate cancer frequently manifests as consecutive PSA rises long before disease is clinically detectable. Imaging with novel radiotracers targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been shown to be more sensitive in identifying the site of disease at lower PSA levels compared with conventional imaging, which may provide increased opportunity for salvage therapy, more aggressive local management of oligometastatic disease or increased confidence in proceeding with systemic therapy [1].
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Purpose: To assess the benefits and risks of co-administering maintenance prednisolone with docetaxel and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in hormone sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSMPC).
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Purpose: As doctors we are required to take consent for radiotherapy; we typically take written consent [1]. We must tell a patient if a treatment might result in a serious adverse outcome, even if the likelihood is very small [2]. As many cancer centres move towards tumour site-specific consent forms for prostate radiotherapy we wanted to ascertain if there was consensus.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, we describe our experience with both drugs at the Diana Princess of Wales Hospital (DPoW), Grimsby.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Purpose: Synchronous chemotherapy with mitomycin C and 5-FU with radiotherapy may have an additional benefit over radiotherapy alone [1]. We looked into the rate of recurrence and median overall survival between these two groups of patients.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Purpose: The use of FDG PET has become more readily available over the past 15 years. It can be used to aid initial staging of testicular tumours and also assess the response to treatment in the metastatic setting, especially as residual masses are frequently seen after chemotherapy. There have been some recent concerns that FDG PET used to assess for residual disease may have a low positive predictive value [1]. A retrospective audit was carried out to look at the performance of FDG PET in seminoma patients treated at the Edinburgh Cancer Centre.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
Purpose: The STAMPEDE trial has recently shown a benefit in overall survival by irradiating the prostate of patients with newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer [1]. This benefit was only shown in patients with low burden of metastatic disease, as per the CHAARTED criteria [2]. The current standard of care for these patients is androgen deprivation therapy ± docetaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy to symptomatic areas of disease if required. The aim of this audit is to determine the potential number of men with low burden of metastatic disease who may require additional radiotherapy.
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
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