Sex-determining region Y box 4 (SOX4) suppresses Hepatitis B virus replication by inhibiting hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α expression

Publication date: Available online 18 February 2020Source: Antiviral ResearchAuthor(s): Shu Shi, Mingchen Liu, Jingyuan Xi, Hui Liu, Guiwen Guan, Congle Shen, Zhengyang Guo, Ting Zhang, Qiang Xu, Dilidaer kudereti, Xiangmei Chen, Jie Wang, Fengmin LuAbstractHepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still a health care crisis in the world, and a considerable number of chronic hepatitis B patients die of end-stage liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. A previous study has reported that sex-determining region Y box 4 (SOX4) promotes HBV replication by binding to the AACAAAG motif in the viral genome. However, such SOX4 binding site was not found in the genome of the majority of HBV genotype strains. Further, we found that SOX4 inhibited rather than promoted the replication of most HBV strains. In line with this, HBV replication was significantly enhanced when the endogenous SOX4 was knocked down. Moreover, we demonstrated that the SOX4-induced suppression of HBV replication was mainly mediated by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). Taken together, our findings suggest that SOX4 plays an important antiviral role by inhibiting HNF4α expression in most HBV strains.
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research

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Abstract HBV is the most common etiology of both liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in Korea. Despite much progress made, the currently available antiviral therapies cannot eradicate or eliminate this virus. Hence, the benefits and risks of antiviral therapy should be carefully evaluated on an individual basis and within the context of the clinical situation. The ultimate goals of treatment are to decrease the mortality from liver disease. The benefits of antiviral therapy come from prevention of progression of liver disease. Understanding the natural history of chronic HBV infection is a key step in the...
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Authors: Tao Y, Wu D, Zhou L, Chen E, Liu C, Tang X, Jiang W, Han N, Li H, Tang H Abstract Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) remains the leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality across the world. If left untreated, approximately one-third of these patients will progress to severe end-stage liver diseases including liver failure, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). High level of serum HBV DNA is strongly associated with the development of liver failure, cirrhosis, and HCC. Therefore, antiviral therapy is crucial for the clinical management of CHB. Current antiviral drugs including nucleoside/nucleot...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Authors: Wang J, Huang H, Liu Y, Chen R, Yan Y, Shi S, Xi J, Zou J, Yu G, Feng X, Lu F Abstract Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains to be a serious threat to public health and is associated with many liver diseases including chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) and pegylated interferon-α (Peg-IFNα) have been confirmed to be efficient in inhibiting HBV replication, it is difficult to eradicate HBV and achieve the clinical cure of CHB. Therefore, long-term therapy has been recommended to CHB treatment under the curren...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is the common chronic viral infection worldwide, affecting approximately 350million people. [1] Because persistently high hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is associated with an increased risk of compensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), [2,3] replication-suppressing antiviral therapy is administered to CHB patients to prevent liver disease progression.[4] As a matter of fact, oral antiviral agents, particularly entecavir (ETV), reduce the risk of long-term complications such as liver compensated cirrhosis and HCC, ultimately improving survivals compared to controls.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is the most common chronic viral infection worldwide, affecting approximately 350 million people.1 Because persistently high hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is associated with an increased risk of compensated cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC),2,3 replication-suppressing antiviral therapy is administered to patients with CHB to prevent liver-disease progression.4 As a matter of fact, oral antiviral agents, particularly entecavir (ETV), reduce the risk of long-term complications such as cirrhosis and HCC, ultimately improving survival compared to controls.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
Authors: Béguelin C, Fall F, Seydi M, Wandeler G Abstract INTRODUCTION: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the most important cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Although the tools to curb the epidemic are known, only a minority of HBV-infected persons are currently diagnosed and treated. Areas covered: We discuss HBV epidemiological trends in SSA, describe important determinants of its natural history, and summarize current knowledge on the continuum of HBV care. Using the results of a systematic review of the literature, we describe the proportion of patients with liver fibrosi...
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
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Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewChronic infection with hepatitis B affects more than 240 million persons worldwide and is a major public health concern. Despite national and global initiatives to promote hepatitis B elimination, including newborn vaccination, catch-up vaccination in adolescents and high-risk adults, screening of the blood supply, and treatment of those in need, both new infections and a reservoir of chronic infections continue to result in morbidity and mortality. As with many chronic diseases, racial and ethnic disparities are seen in hepatitis B virus infection. The goal of this review is to synthesize the data...
Source: Current Hepatitis Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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