Environmentally responsive hydrogels for repair of cardiovascular tissue

AbstractCardiovascular diseases (CVDs) pose a serious threat to human health, which are characterized by high disability and mortality rate globally such as myocardial infarction (MI), atherosclerosis, and heart failure. Although stem cells transplantation and growth factors therapy are promising, their low survival rate and loss at the site of injury are major obstacles to this therapy. Recently, the development of hydrogel scaffold materials provides a new way to solve this problem, which have shown the potential to treat CVD. Among these scaffold materials, environmentally responsive hydrogels have great prospects in repairing the microenvironment of cardiovascular tissues and vascular regeneration. They provide a new method for the treatment of cardiovascular tissue repair and space-time control for the release of various therapeutic drugs, including small-molecule drugs, growth factors, and stem cells. Herein, this article reviews the occurrence and current treatment of CVD, as well as the repair of cardiovascular injury by several environmental responsive hydrogels systems currently used, mainly focusing on the delivery of growth factors or the application of cell therapy to revascularization. In addition, we will also discuss the enormous potential and personal perspectives of environmentally responsive hydrogels in cardiovascular repair.
Source: Heart Failure Reviews - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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