Interfering Role of ER α on Adiponectin Action in Breast Cancer

Obesity is characterized by an excess of adipose tissue, due to adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ producing many bioactive molecules, called adipokines. During obesity, dysfunctional adipocytes alter adipokine secretion, contributing to pathophysiology of obesity-associated diseases, including metabolic syndrome, type 2-diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and many types of malignancies. Circulating adiponectin levels are inversely correlated with BMI, thus adiponectin concentrations are lower in obese than normal-weight subjects. Many clinical investigations highlight that low adiponectin levels represent a serious risk factor in breast carcinogenesis, and are associated with the development of more aggressive phenotype. A large-scale meta-analysis suggests that BMI was positively associated with breast cancer mortality in women with ERα-positive disease, regardless menopausal status. This suggests the importance of estrogen signaling contribution in breast tumorigenesis of obese patients. It has been largely demonstrated that adiponectin exerts a protective role in ERα-negative cells, promoting anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects, while controversial data have been reported in ERα-positive cells. Indeed, emerging data provide evidences that adiponectin in obese patients behave as growth factor in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. This addresses how ERα signaling interference may enhance the potent...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 4 April 2020Source: Radiation Physics and ChemistryAuthor(s): B. Juste, R. Miró, S. Morató, G. Verdú, S. Peris
Source: Radiation Physics and Chemistry - Category: Physics Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 April 2020Source: Journal of Molecular StructureAuthor(s): T. Valarmathi, R. Premkumar, A. Milton Franklin Benial
Source: Journal of Molecular Structure - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 April 2020Source: Redox BiologyAuthor(s): Raúl González, María A. Rodríguez-Hernández, María Negrete, Kalina Ranguelova, Aurelie Rossin, Carmen Choya-Foces, Patricia de la Cruz-Ojeda, Antonio Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio Martínez-Ruiz, Sergio Rius-Pérez, Juan Sastre, José A. Bárcena, Anne-Odile Hueber, C. Alicia Padilla, Jordi Muntané
Source: Redox Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that MTC is a more immunologically active tumor that has been previously reported. Patients with advanced MTC should be screened for targetable antigens and immune checkpoints to determine their eligibility for current clinical trials. Additional studies are necessary to fully characterize the antigenic potential of MTC and may encourage the development of adoptive T cells therapies for this rare tumor. PMID: 32242507 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Thyroid : official journal of the American Thyroid Association - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Thyroid Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 April 2020Source: Journal of Environmental PsychologyAuthor(s): Kati Peditto, Mardelle Shepley, Naomi Sachs, Jane Mendle, Anthony Burrow
Source: Journal of Environmental Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2020Source: Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 69Author(s): Ji Wang, Tong Wu, Li Fang, Chunlei Liu, Xiaoting Liu, Hongmei Li, Junhua Shi, Meihe Li, Weihong Min
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Dr. Matija Snuderl, neuropathologist and molecular pathologist at  New York University Langone Health, was featured ina recent article appearing inNature (March 26, 2020, Vol 579, p S14-S16). The article, which addresses the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in cancer diagnostics, opens with Dr. Snuderl experiencing a moment that many of us neuropathologists have had wherein we hesitate before signing out a case because of a feeling that something might be just a bit different about a particular specimen. That feeling prompts us to do something else (run more ancillary testing, get a consult, sleep on it and ta...
Source: neuropathology blog - Category: Radiology Tags: neuropathologists Source Type: blogs
Dan Hu1†, Meijin Zhang2†, Hejun Zhang1, Yan Xia1, Jinxiu Lin2, Xiongwei Zheng1, Feng Peng2* and Wenquan Niu3* 1Department of Pathology, Fujian Cancer Hospital &Fujian Medical University Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou, China 2Department of Cardiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China 3Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China Background and Objectives: Growing evidence indicates that metabolic syndrome confers a differential risk for the development and progression of many types of cancer, especially in the digestive tr...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Bariatric surgery appears to be capable of partially reversing the obesity-related epigenome. The identification of potential epigenetic biomarkers predictive for the success of bariatric surgery may open new doors to personalized therapy for severe obesity. Introduction Obesity is currently a huge healthcare problem, worldwide, and is a risk factor for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease and cancer (1). As the prevalence of obesity reaches pandemic proportions, this metabolic disease is estimated to become the biggest cause of mortality in the near future (2). In fact,...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of reviewObesity contributes to an estimated forty-percent, or 630,000 cases, of malignant neoplasms diagnosed in the United States, and higher body mass index (BMI) has been associated with at least seventeen types of solid tumors, including 9% of all breast cancer cases. In this review, we discuss the impact of obesity and consequences of obesity, including the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus, on breast cancer risk and recurrence.Recent findingsRecent work has identified multiple molecular mechanisms that may underlie the association between obesity and breast cancer. In particular, insuli...
Source: Current Surgery Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
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