Arthroscopic Primary Repair of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament With Single-Bundle Graft Augmentation

Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: Arthroscopy TechniquesAuthor(s): Harmen D. Vermeijden, Jelle P. van der List, Gregory S. DiFeliceAbstractRecently, there has been a resurgence of interest in ligament preservation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that has the advantage of preserving the native tissue and maintaining proprioceptive function. Studies reporting outcomes of remnant-preserving ACL surgery have shown encouraging results with a higher potential for early healing and better functional outcomes compared with remnant-resecting surgery. Over the past decade, several surgical techniques for remnant preservation of the ACL have been proposed. In this technical note, the technique of primary ACL repair with graft augmentation is described. The goal of this technique is to preserve and tension the native tissue, thereby restoring the anatomy as much as possible while avoiding cyclops lesions, whereas the additional graft provides strength to the repaired ligament.
Source: Arthroscopy Techniques - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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AbstractPurposeCapsular volume reduction in the context of anterior arthroscopic shoulder stabilization represents an important but uncontrolled parameter. The aim of this study was to analyse capsular volume reduction by arthroscopic Bankart repair with an individualized capsular shift in patients with and without ligamentous hyperlaxity compared to a control group.MethodsIn the context of a prospective controlled study, intraoperative capsular volume measurements were performed in 32 patients with anterior shoulder instability before and after arthroscopic Bankart repair with an individualized capsular shift. The results...
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
When considering repair of the meniscal cartilages of the knee, the indications for repair must be carefully considered. The morphology of the tear, the zone of injury, and likely vascularity have an impact on patient selection. Patient factors, chronicity of tear, medial or lateral tear, and tear complexity all have a bearing on whether to repair or resect and how best to achieve stable repair. The consequences of meniscectomy are well established, and meniscal tissue resection comes at a cost.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Commentary Source Type: research
The importance of treating meniscal root tears has been increasingly recognized, and surgeons have to make conscious decisions routinely regarding repair for select patients. The clinical and patient demographic differences between medial and lateral meniscal root tears are important and ultimately leave us wondering whether outcome differences are due to unique anatomic factors or the patient population sustaining these injuries.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Commentary Source Type: research
Whether to repair or resect meniscal tears remains a matter of controversy. In theory, partial meniscectomy increases contact pressure, which may result in progressive and early cartilage degeneration and early osteoarthritis. Meniscal preservation is the preferred treatment option, but only a small percentage of meniscal tears are suitable for repair. Two recent registry studies challenge this approach and suggest that partial meniscectomy has similar clinical outcomes in the short term. Whether these findings can be maintained in the long term remains to be seen.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Commentary Source Type: research
Vented open-architecture suture anchors provide theoretical benefits over traditional screw-in solid anchors to include improved osseous ingrowth, elution of marrow elements to enhance biology at the repair site, and easier revision because of reduced anchor material. However, there is no evidence that open-architecture anchors result in improvements in patient-reported outcomes or early cytokine and marrow element release into the subacromial space compared with traditional screw-in solid anchors.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Commentary Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 March 2020Source: Journal of OrthopaedicsAuthor(s): Zhen Tan, Benjamins A. Hendy, Benjamin Zmistowski, Robin S. Camp, Charles L. Getz, Joseph A. Abboud, Surena Namdari
Source: Journal of Orthopaedics - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
It is recommended that patients cease smoking before rotator cuff repair. However, not all patients want to or are able to successfully cease smoking. This raises the question if these patients should be advised to pursue surgical intervention or if surgery should be contraindicated until patients successfully cease smoking.
Source: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionIntraoperative anchor pullout during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is an uncommon but cumbersome complication. There are some techniques already introduced to deal with this complication. In comparison, not one technique is overwhelmingly superior to others; however, our new technique which is bar anchoring with a threaded Steinmann pin could be another solution, since it could utilize primary anchor sites and results appear to be acceptable.Level of evidence III.
Source: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent biologically enhanced patch augmentation repair for the treatment of revision massive rotator cuff tears.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Meniscal cysts are not uncommon in clinical practice, with reported incidence rates varying from 1 to 22%. Most meniscal cysts are parameniscal cysts, which are created by extravasation of synovial fluid throu...
Source: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Tags: Case report Source Type: research
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