How Travelers Around the World Are Dealing With ‘Voluntary’ Home Quarantines, To Help Slow Potential Coronavirus Spread

On his return from China last week, Dr. Ian Lipkin quarantined himself in his basement. His wife now puts his food on the stairs. He’s run out of things to watch on Netflix. At odd hours, he walks in New York’s Central Park, keeping 10 feet away from others. Lipkin is among hundreds of people in the U.S. and thousands around the world who, although not sick, are living in semi-voluntary quarantine at home. With attention focused on quarantined cruise ships and evacuees housed on U.S. military bases, those in their own homes have largely escaped notice. They, too, experts say, play a crucial role in slowing the spread of the new viral disease now called COVID-19. Most cases and nearly all deaths have been in mainland China. Around the world, authorities are urging two weeks of home quarantine and symptom monitoring for travelers returning from there. It’s the only tool they have. “We don’t yet have a vaccine and we don’t have approved drugs for prevention of disease or treatment of disease. So all we have is isolation,” said Lipkin, who directs Columbia University’s Center for Infection and Immunity. An expert virus hunter, Lipkin was invited by Chinese health authorities to help assess the risk posed by COVID-19. He did similar work in China during the SARS outbreak in 2003. “This is my second time in the slammer,” said Lipkin, who spent time in quarantine then. He will end his confinement Tuesday, celebrating with...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 New York onetime Source Type: news

Related Links:

J Psychiatr Res. 2021 Jun 4;140:533-544. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.05.080. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been associated with mental health consequences due to direct (i.e., SARS-CoV-2 infection, potentially due to neuronal or astrocytic infection, microvascular, or inflammatory mechanisms) and indirect (i.e., social and economic impacts of COVID-19 prevention measures) effects. Investigation of mental health in a region with one of the longest lockdowns and lowest COVID-19 prevalence globally (Victoria, Australia) allowed for evaluation of mental health in the abse...
Source: Australian Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
This report points to the importance of oc cupation as a risk factor but also to the availability and use of appropriate personal protection to mitigate the risk of becoming infected. In addition, well-established socio-economic factors of health inequalities intermingled with occupations at risk, demonstrated by the fact that most taxi driv ers belonged to the same ethnic group and that taxi drivers had higher mortality rates when residing in London (5). These findings are mirrored in a recent preprint publication from the US state of California, reporting that relative excess mortality was particularly high among food/ag...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Yes, the COVID-19 pandemic is long. Since the WHO characterised the virus’ spread as a pandemic in March, cases have been climbing; countries are facing a second wave and are entering lockdown 2.0; and many aspects of our current lifestyle will continue through 2021. But this isn’t what we mean by “long COVID.” This newly-minted term refers to patients experiencing long-term sequelae of a COVID infection. It’s not an exact medical term as it is a patient-made one apparently first used by Elisa Perego in a tweet to describe her own experience. Additionally, two patients can have different #l...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine E-Patients Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Portable Medical Diagnostics Telemedicine & Smartphones AI diabetes lumosity wearables sleep tracking Fitbit mental heal Source Type: blogs
Yes, the COVID-19 pandemic is long. Since the WHO characterised the virus’ spread as a pandemic in March, cases have been climbing; countries are facing a second wave and are entering lockdown 2.0; and many aspects of our current lifestyle will continue through 2021. But this isn’t what we mean by “long COVID.” This newly-minted term refers to patients experiencing long-term sequelae of a COVID infection. It’s not an exact medical term as it is a patient-made one apparently first used by Elisa Perego in a tweet to describe her own experience. Additionally, two patients can have different #l...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine E-Patients Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Portable Medical Diagnostics Telemedicine & Smartphones AI diabetes lumosity wearables sleep tracking Fitbit mental heal Source Type: blogs
Authors: Banerjee D, Rao TSS Abstract The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2, has emerged as a global public health threat. The implications are much beyond just health crisis, and it has long-lasting psychosocial and economic implications. Although the psychological offshoots such as depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress, and sleep disturbances are being studied in-depth, there is a dearth of literature on the sexual well-being and sexual practices during this pandemic. Considering the physical distancing; travel restrictions; the high human-human tran...
Source: Indian Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Indian J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Objective: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has radically changed the world in a few weeks. Italy has been one of the first and most affected countries with more than 30,000 deaths up to now. Public health measures as quarantine or national lockdown are necessary to limit the spread of infectious diseases, but it is unsurprising that depriving people of their liberty has negative psychological effects. This is especially the case for people with chronic diseases, including neurological conditions like multiple sclerosis (MS). People with MS (PwMS) have a higher burden of neuropsychiatric comorbidities and are known ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
As a critical care doctor in New York City, Monica is used to dealing with high-octane situations and treating severely ill patients. But she says the COVID-19 outbreak is unlike anything she’s seen before. Over the past few weeks, operating rooms have been transformed into ICUs, physicians of all backgrounds have been drafted into emergency room work, and two of her colleagues became ICU patients. While Monica is proud of her coworkers for rising to the challenge, she says it’s been hard for them to fight a prolonged battle against a deadly, highly contagious illness with no known cure. To make matters worse,...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news
 It’s often said that fear is the most dangerous virus on the planet. While a relatively small percentage of people will contract the new coronavirus, or COVID-19, the fear it provokes will chip away at the mental health of nearly everyone who hears about it. So why does COVID-19 inspire so much fear when there are other diseases lurking in the shadows? And what can we do about it? In today’s podcast, our guest Dr. David Batman, a registered medical practitioner in the U.K., discusses how this high level of unprecedented global panic is being intensified by the non-stop media, and specifically, social media....
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Health-related Interview Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
Most health advice can be boiled down to simple behaviors, like eating a balanced diet, exercising and getting good sleep. During a pandemic like COVID-19, these actions are especially crucial for maintaining you physical and mental well-being. But social distancing complicates things. How are you supposed to eat right when you’re living on non-perishables? How can you work out when you’re cooped up at home? How can you sleep when you’re anxious about, well, everything? This expert-backed guide is a good place to start. Here’s how to stay healthy (and calm) while social distancing during the COVID-1...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news
More News: Anxiety | Bananas | Blueberries | China Health | Coronavirus | COVID-19 | ENT & OMF | Health | Hong Kong Health | India Health | International Medicine & Public Health | Israel Health | Laboratory Medicine | Learning | Macau Health | Middle East Health | Outbreaks | SARS | Science | Singapore Health | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Sports Medicine | Sweden Health | Taiwan Health | Thailand Health | Universities & Medical Training | Vaccines