How patches made from human placenta could save men's love lives

Patches made from human placenta could prevent men becoming impotent following prostate cancer surgery. Incontinence and erectile dysfunction can occur in up to seven in ten men.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: 15 February 2021Source: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Volume 404, Part BAuthor(s): Yanhua Liu, Yang Li, Shanshan Dong, Lu Han, Ruixin Guo, Yourong Fu, Shenghu Zhang, Jianqiu Chen
Source: Journal of Hazardous Materials - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
Authors: Musio F Abstract INTRODUCTION: Anemia has and will continue to be a central theme in medicine particularly as clinicians are treating a burgeoning population of complex multi-organ system processes. As a result of multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses, and societal recommendations overly restrictive paradigms and under-administration of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) have likely been followed by clinicians among all specialties. AREAS COVERED: A review of anemia in the context of chronic kidney disease, hematologic malignancies and cancer is presented with focus on the e...
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2021Source: Urology Case Reports, Volume 34Author(s): Nina Al-Saadi, Safa Al-Musawi, Yousuf Khan, Daben Dawam
Source: Urology Case Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Authors: Matti B, Zargar-Shoshtari K Abstract Prostate cancer represents a significant health burden worldwide. The cancer incidence had substantially increased since the introduction of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in cancer screening. This had led to considerable debates among health professionals and epidemiologists, since PSA as a screening tool seemed to be far from perfect. In New Zealand, the controversy was quite prominent in the last three decades, with some advocating the benefits of screening, while others concerned regarding the risk of harms. With the absence of an organised screening programme and ...
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This study found that childhood cancer survivors in New Zealand had a high prevalence of developmental dental abnormalities and it identified potential risk factors related to their cancer treatment. Inequitable access to oral rehabilitation for this patient group argues for a mechanism for consistent improved access to publicly funded dental care across district health boards in New Zealand. PMID: 33032302 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: There was no impact of timing between RP and RT on urinary, bowel, and erectile adverse events related to RT. Thus, our RTOG 9601 post hoc analysis challenges the current belief that early postsurgical RT compromises functional outcomes more than late RT and support additional research to evaluate the perceived benefit in terms of adverse effects by prolonging the time between RP and RT. PMID: 31653564 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Urologic Oncology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Urol Oncol Source Type: research
Medical device companies attempting to market a new treatment in the U.S. often make the erroneous assumption that winning FDA approval is the final destination, and success is theirs. In fact, going through the regulatory process is only the halfway point. The grueling path from FDA approval to reimbursement is like a treacherous walk through Death Valley and many companies don’t make it through. In this case study, I discuss the trials and triumphs of bringing robotic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), a non-invasive procedure for localized prostate cancer, to the U.S.&Aci...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Business Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of ReviewDue to the proximity of the rhabdosphincter and cavernous nerves to the membranous urethra, reconstruction of membranous urethral stricture implies a risk of urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. To avoid these complications, endoscopic management of membranous urethral strictures is traditionally favored, and bulboprostatic anastomosis is reserved as the main classical approach for open reconstruction of recalcitrant membranous urethral stricture. The preference for the anastomotic urethroplasty among reconstructive urologists is likely influenced by the familiarity and experience with tr...
Source: Current Urology Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
By age 60, you have a 50/50 chance of having a clinically enlarged prostate. And it only gets worse every year. When your prostate isn’t functioning properly, it’s hard to enjoy life. Traditional doctors give you two choices. Go under the knife or you take Big Pharma’s drugs. Either way, you have a good chance of ending up with your manhood on the line… If you have surgery, there’s a big risk you’ll be saying goodbye to your sex life for good. The rate of impotence is a shocking 50 to 60% after prostate surgery.1 Big Pharma’s meds to shrink your prostate are no better. These sy...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
PROSTATE cancer patients and doctors could soon get better guidance on treatment options thanks to a new ‘checklist’. Side effects of treatment can include erectile dysfunction or incontinence - but some men with symptoms don't know what the best option is.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Erectile Dysfunction | Health | Impotence | Incontinence | Prostate Cancer