AHA News: Diabetes, Alzheimer's Together Might Increase Stroke Severity

MONDAY, Feb. 17, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Bleeding strokes are the deadliest type of stroke and the hardest to treat. What might make matters worse is having both diabetes and Alzheimer's disease versus either condition alone, new...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Related Links:

This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Anemia on admission was associated with higher mortality and an increased risk of poor outcome in patients with ICH. However, the results were limited by the high heterogeneity of included studies. Prospective, multi-center or population-based, large sample cohort studies are needed in the future. Introduction Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the second most common cause of stroke and a highly lethal disease (1), which still lacks effective therapeutic interventions (2, 3). Although age, baseline ICH volume and neurological status on admission are well-known predictors of outcome of ICH (4), none of t...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news
In this study, researchers put some numbers to the correlation, and improve on previous attempts to rule out wealth and other effects as significant contributing causes. A study finds that a Chinese policy is unintentionally causing people in northern China to live 3.1 years less than people in the south, due to air pollution concentrations that are 46 percent higher. These findings imply that every additional 10 micrograms per cubic meter of particulate matter pollution reduces life expectancy by 0.6 years. The elevated mortality is entirely due to an increase in cardiorespiratory deaths, indicating that air poll...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, in order to allow faithful and meaningful discoveries, future analysis of iPSCs and their derivatives should not shy away from mitochondrial genome monitoring and single-cell technology. A Copy of the Self: Today's Airy Philosophy is Tomorrow's Practical Concern https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/09/a-copy-of-the-self-todays-airy-philosophy-is-tomorrows-practical-concern/ The march of technology turns matters of philosophy into matters of practical action. The process of taking visions and making them concrete makes once airy hypotheticals relevant in everyday life. The theoria of th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
My friends Lelir and Westi in Bali don’t like to go to doctors. Nature is their pharmacy. You see, Lelir is a Balian. That means “herbal healer.” And Westi’s plantation is bursting with healing plants.  But one plant stands out above all the others. Lelir uses it to make a daily immune-boosting elixir as well as an anti-aging facial scrub. Balians use it as an antibiotic and for liver support. They boil it with milk and sugar to treat the common cold and allergies. Rural doctors make it into a paste with lime to ease sore joints. They make drinks to treat fevers and stomach pain. They mix it wi...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Natural Cures Source Type: news
This study builds on preliminary findings from the first phase of the INTERSTROKE study, which identified ten modifiable risk factors for stroke in 6,000 participants from 22 countries. The full-scale INTERSTROKE study included an additional 20,000 individuals from 32 countries in Europe, Asia, America, Africa and Australia, and sought to identify the main causes of stroke in diverse populations, young and old, men and women, and within subtypes of stroke. To estimate the proportion of strokes caused by specific risk factors, the investigators calculated the population attributable risk for each factor (PAR; an esti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion This study found people taking PPIs had a 44% higher risk of developing dementia in a seven-year period compared with those not taking the drugs. However, it's not accurate to say this was down to the PPIs – the study couldn't prove this, and there are many possible explanations. For a start, the groups weren't very similar. Those taking PPIs had poorer health, and were more likely to be taking a number of medicines and have conditions linked to a higher risk of dementia, such as diabetes and heart disease. After taking these factors into account in the analysis, the link between...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Neurology Older people Source Type: news
More News: Alzheimer's | Bleeding | Cardiology | Diabetes | Endocrinology | General Medicine | Heart | Stroke