The Impact of Ethnicity on Cardiovascular Risk Reduction and Heart Age After Bariatric Surgery

AbstractBackgroundRisk factors for heart disease include arterial hypertension, high cholesterol, tobacco abuse, and obesity. There is a paucity of data regarding role of ethnicity in bariatric surgery (BS) outcomes. The study ’s aim is to determine if ethnicity plays a significant role in BS outcomes, heart age, and cardiovascular risk.MethodsWe conducted a retrospective review of data collected concurrently from patients who underwent BS from 2010 to 2015. We analyzed demographics, comorbidities, heart age, and cardiovascular risk-score at surgery and 12-month follow-up. Ethnicities categorized were Caucasian and African American. Heart age was calculated using the Framingham Study Heart Age Calculator and cardiovascular risk-score using the Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Calculator.ResultsA total of 292 patients presented all the variables needed to calculate heart age and cardiovascular risk score. This patient population was composed of 85% Caucasians and 15% African American. Female gender represented 67% (N = 202) of patients with mean age of 52.6 ± 10.7 years. LSG was the most prevalent procedure performed in 73.2% (N = 213) of patients. Mean BMI pre-operatively versus post-operatively by ethnicity was 41.46 ± 4.66 vs 30.08 ± 4.34 Caucasians and 41.90 ± 4.69 vs 32.08 ± 4.68 African Americans. Mean heart age pre-op...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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AbstractIntroductionLithuania has one of the highest mortality rates from coronary heart disease (CHD) among European countries. Most CHD are preventable, but when they occur, the management of these patients is important in secondary prevention. The purpose of the present analysis was to describe the demographics, clinical profile, and contemporary management of patients with stable CHD in the Lithuanian population and to compare data with other Central Eastern European countries.MethodsCLARIFY (prospective observational longitudinal registry of patients with stable CHD) is an international cohort study in outpatients wit...
Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Abstract Coronary heart disease kills twice as many women as breast cancer in the UK and is the single biggest killer of women worldwide. Underlying risk factors include hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and smoking. Mulder and colleagues have performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature and demonstrated that women with infertility are significantly more likely to have certain cardiometabolic risk factors, namely increased BMI, cholesterol and triglycerides, when compared with fertile women. PMID: 32191381 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
This study was not perfect. You could argue, as these authors do, that the fact that participants chose their preferred diet is a good thing, as it could theoretically improve adherence. However, it also resulted in very different-sized groups to start with. The varying adherence and exercise option choices were adjusted for as well as possible. And the study relied heavily on self-reporting, which is always iffy. Healthy eating patterns have benefits beyond weight loss But we can still learn a great deal here. The Mediterranean approach to eating (which can be easily modified to suit any country or cultural food preferenc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cooking and recipes Diet and Weight Loss Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
Fibre linked to lower ischaemic stroke risk Related items fromOnMedica Obesity associated with worse mortality and higher CVD risk Heart disease and stroke deaths plummet in Scotland Vegetarians and pescatarians have lower risk of CHD Glucosamine supplements may reduce stroke risk Young adults with hypertension or hypercholesterolaemia have greater risk of heart disease in later life
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
(Natural News) Heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases (e.g., stroke) are the leading causes of death in western countries. These diseases are caused by several factors, such as hypertension, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, smoking and obesity. However, recent studies have found that there is another unexpected contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis (blood clot...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusions: CV risk calculations revealed higher than rates than expected with consequently reflected on higher than estimated CVRAS. This represents the first report of its kind in Honduras.
Source: IJC Heart and Vasculature - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
This study found an association between stroke risk and longer sleep, longer midday napping, or poor sleep quality. But an association is not the same as causation. Rather than longer sleep duration causing strokes, there are other possible explanations for the findings. For example, people who sleep more at night or nap more during the day may have other risk factors for stroke, such as: A higher incidence of depression. Excessive sleeping or poor sleep quality may be symptoms of depression, and prior studies have noted higher stroke rates among depressed individuals. A more sedentary lifestyle. Those who are not active ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Hypertension and Stroke Sleep Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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