Invasive aspergillosis of gastrointestinal debut without apparent respiratory involvement in an immunocompetent host.

Invasive aspergillosis of gastrointestinal debut without apparent respiratory involvement in an immunocompetent host. Rev Esp Enferm Dig. 2020 Feb 14;112: Authors: Díaz Alcázar MDM, Ruiz Escolano E, Casado Caballero FJ, Cervilla Sáez de Tejada E Abstract A 72-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and constipation and intestinal dilation was found. Abdominal computed tomography showed two areas of thickening and stenosis in the proximal jejunum and preterminal ileum, with an unknown etiology. Exploratory laparotomy was proposed but the patient suffered a sudden and progressive decrease in consciousness. Cranial computed tomography showed an ischemic area and a midline shift. Brain biopsies suggested infection by Aspergillus Fumigatus. Despite antifungal drugs, the patient had a progressive clinical deterioration and died. The autopsy concluded a systemic infection due to Aspergillus Fumigatus. Invasive aspergillosis is a serious fungal infection and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. It mainly affects the lungs, followed by the gastrointestinal tract. The most frequent location in gastrointestinal involvement is the small bowel. Gastrointestinal involvement is more frequent in invasive disease. Although, there are case reports of isolated gastrointestinal aspergillosis, even in immunocompetent patients without risk factors. The prognosis is poor. PMID: 32054273 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Revista Espanola de Enfermedades Digestivas - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Rev Esp Enferm Dig Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian StudiesAuthor(s): Maria P. Volpato, Izabela C.A. Breda, Ravena C. de Carvalho, Caroline de Castro Moura, Laís L. Ferreira, Marcelo L. Silva, Josie R.T. Silva
Source: Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Surgical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST) to indicate therapeutic response to definitive chemoradiotherapy, as well as prediction of recurrence and death in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods Before and after recieving definitive chemoradiotherapy, 181 patients with esophageal cancer underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). PERCIST, reduction rates of tumor uptake and volume of whole lesions, tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging regarding progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using log-rank and Cox m...
Source: Nuclear Medicine Communications - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions L-SURmax showed the most powerful predictive performance than the other PET parameters in predicting occult lymph node metastasis. The combination of three independent risk factors (carcinoembryonic antigen, cytokeratin 19 fragment, and L-SURmax) can effectively predict occult lymph node metastasis in clinical N0 non–small cell lung cancer patients.
Source: Nuclear Medicine Communications - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusion In patients with MTC, the burden of metastatic bone disease is associated with OS.
Source: Nuclear Medicine Communications - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusion Semi-quantitative F-18 FDG PET parameters (SUVmax, MTV and T/L) were found to be significantly correlated with Fuhrman grade in patients with RCC and are important markers for differentiation between low- and high-grade tumors. Furthermore, forced diuresis had no incremental value in characterization of primary RCC lesions.
Source: Nuclear Medicine Communications - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Source: Journal of Pain Research - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Journal of Pain Research Source Type: research
Abstract Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) occurs in immunocompromised hosts and is classified as PJP with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (HIV-PJP) and PJP without HIV infection (non-HIV PJP). Non-HIV PJP rapidly progresses to respiratory failure compared with HIV-PJP possibly due to the difference in immune conditions; namely, the prognosis of non-HIV PJP is worse than that of HIV PJP. However, the diagnosis of non-HIV PJP at the early stage is difficult. Herein, we report a case of severe non-HIV PJP successfully managed with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-V ECMO). A 54-yea...
Source: The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Tohoku J Exp Med Source Type: research
Abstract To observe blood vessels at high contrasts, we constructed a first-generation triple-sensitivity X-ray computed tomography (TS-CT) scanner using a cadmium-telluride (CdTe) detector and a triple-amplifying system. X-ray photons are absorbed by the CdTe crystal, and the electric charges produced by photons are converted into voltages using a current-to-voltage (I-V) amplifier, and the I-V output is amplified by a voltage-to-voltage (V-V) amplifier. The V-V output 1 is sent to a dual V-V amplifier through a 5.0-m-length coaxial cable and amplified to two-different outputs of 2 and 3. The three outputs 1-3 ar...
Source: Applied Radiation and Isotopes - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Appl Radiat Isot Source Type: research
The hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis acts to release cortisol into the blood stream, as cortisol calls the body into action to combat stress. When high amounts of cortisol interact with the hypothalamus, the HPA axis will slow down its activity. The amygdala detects stress, while the prefrontal cortex regulates our reactions to stress. Source: Bezdek K and Telzer E (2017) Have No Fear, the Brain is Here! How Your Brain Responds to Stress. Front. Young Minds. 5:71. doi: 10.3389/frym.2017.00071 _______ [Editor’s note: Continued from yesterday’s Exploring the human brain and how it responds to...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness #WorldHealthDay brain burnout cognition Cortisol GAS General Adaptation Syndrome homeostasis memory neurobiology neurological exhaustion Stress Source Type: blogs
More News: Aspergillosis | Aspergillus | Brain | Constipation | CT Scan | Fungal Infections | Gastroenterology | Laparotomy | Neurology | Pain | Respiratory Medicine