Evaluation of factors that may affect disease development and severity in childhood atopic dermatitis.

CONCLUSIONS: Low topical corticosteroid requirement and sleep disturbance rates in the subjects regularly using moisturizers emphasize the importance of emollient use in treatment. The association of cesarean delivery, history of incubator, and birth in winter with severe disease suggests that disease severity is related to less exposure to environmental allergens in the hygiene hypothesis. PMID: 32057217 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia - Category: Dermatology Tags: G Ital Dermatol Venereol Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: We found lack of evidence to address our review question: for most of our interventions of interest, we found no eligible studies. The neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist serlopitant was the only intervention that we could assess. One study provided low-certainty evidence suggesting that serlopitant may reduce pruritus intensity when compared with placebo. We are uncertain of the effects of serlopitant on other outcomes, as certainty of the evidence is very low. More studies with larger sample sizes, focused on patients with CPUO, are needed. Healthcare professionals, patients, and other stakeholders may h...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
The immediate priority for clinicians managing patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is treating the disease, particularly the constant itch and sleep disturbance, with its consequential disruption of both home and work life and association with low mood, poorer concentration, and productivity. However, long-term sequelae are important to consider and include those directly related to the atopic march (asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and food allergies), the consequences of having a chronic disease, and potential side effects of therapy, particularly topical corticosteroids.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Discussion Sarcoidosis is rare and is even rarer in the pediatric age group. Sarcoidosis is seen in all ages with an estimated prevalence is 10-40/100,000 in the U.S. population. Pediatric sarcoidosis has an estimated incidence of 0.2/100,000 per year. For the pediatric age range it is more likely from 9-15 years of age. In adults it commonly presents between 20-39 years but bimodal distribution is also reported. Women are more likely to have sarcoidosis than men. African American females have the highest risk, and usually present slightly older, especially in the 4th decade of life. African American women are also more li...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 7 January 2019Source: Journal of Ginseng ResearchAuthor(s): Laura Rojas Lorz, Mi-Yeon Kim, Jae Youl ChoAbstractAtopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and relapsing inflammatory disease that affects 1%-20% of people worldwide. Despite affecting many people, AD current treatments such as corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, have not only harmful secondary effects but are also often ineffective. Therefore, natural non-toxic compounds are on high demand for developing new effective AD treatments. Panax ginseng Meyer, has been used traditionally for its promising healing and restorative pr...
Source: Journal of Ginseng Research - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
AbstractItch (pruritus) is a key clinical feature of atopic dermatitis, has a complex pathogenesis and markedly affects health-related quality of life. Treatment differs according to itch severity, but should always include the use of barrier creams and moisturizers/emollients, as well as patient education and lifestyle advice to manage sleep and reduce stress. Depending on itch severity, treatment with topical corticosteroids, systemic immunosuppressants and other pharmacological and nonpharmacological options may be added using a stepwise treatment approach.
Source: Drugs and Therapy Perspectives - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
AbstractDupilumab (Dupixent®), a subcutaneously administered, fully human IgG4 monoclonal antibody directed against the IL (interleukin)-4 receptor α subunit, blocks the signalling of IL-4 and IL-13, two T helper cell type 2 cytokines implicated in the immunopathology of atopic dermatitis (AD). It is the first biologic therapy to have been approved for the treatment of adult patients with moderate-to-severe AD in the EU and USA. In phase III t rials in adults with moderate-to-severe AD who were inadequately controlled with topical medications and/or systemic treatments, such as ciclosporin, or for whom these ther...
Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Abstract The effects of weather and air pollution on atopic dermatitis (AD) flares have not been well investigated. To investigate the effects of particulate matter (PM) on AD symptoms by weather type, a total of 125 young children (76 boys and 49 girls) under 6 years of age with AD living in Seoul, Korea, were enrolled as a panel and followed for 17 months between August 2013 and December 2014. AD symptoms were recorded on a daily basis, including itching, sleep disturbance, erythema, dry skin, oozing, and edema. Daily weather was classified into 7 categories according to spatial synoptic classification (SSC). Pe...
Source: International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Int J Hyg Environ Health Source Type: research
Dupilumab with concomitant topical corticosteroids in adult patients with atopic dermatitis who are not adequately controlled with or are intolerant to ciclosporin A, or when this treatment is medically inadvisable: a placebo-controlled, randomized phase 3 clinical trial (LIBERTY AD CAFÉ). Br J Dermatol. 2017 Nov 28;: Authors: de Bruin-Weller M, Thaçi D, Smith CH, Reich K, Cork M, Radin A, Zhang Q, Akinlade B, Gadkari A, Eckert L, Hultsch T, Chen Z, Pirozzi G, Graham NMH, Shumel B Abstract BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that may require systemic...
Source: The British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Br J Dermatol Source Type: research
Abstract Since control of atopic dermatitis (AD) remains challenging but has not been adequately characterized, the objective of this study was to characterize disease control among patients with a history of moderate to severe AD. Data were from the 2014 Adelphi US AD Disease Specific Programme, a cross‐sectional survey of physicians (n = 202) and their patients with history of moderate to severe AD (n = 1064, 54% female, 75% white, mean age 40 years). Inadequately controlled AD as rated by the physician was defined as currently flaring; deteriorating/changeable AD; or physician dissatisfaction ...
Source: The Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract BackgroundAtopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that may require systemic therapy. Ciclosporin A (CsA) is a widely‐used, potent immunosuppressant for AD. CsA is not effective in all patients, and side effects limit its use. Dupilumab, a fully human anti‐interleukin (IL)‐4 receptor‐alpha monoclonal antibody, inhibits signaling of IL‐4 and IL‐13, key drivers of type 2/Th2‐mediated inflammation, and is approved in the U.S.A. and the E.U. for the treatment of adults with moderate‐to‐severe AD. ObjectivesTo evaluate efficacy and safety of dupilumab with concomitant topical cort...
Source: British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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