Best supplements for the heart: The supplement proven to reduce your risk of heart disease

BEST supplements for the heart: One of the gravest threats to life expectancy is heart disease so taking steps to protect your heart could mean the difference between life or death. Taking supplements for your heart has been met with a degree of scepticism over the years due to scant evidence, but recent research suggests a particular supplement may hold promise as a form of protection against heart disease.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusions: This survey highlights a critical gap in knowledge about cardiac monitoring and potentially life-saving opportunities for preventive cardiac medical management. Future studies focusing on timing and detection of RIHD may elucidate the utility of cardiac monitoring for TRT patients.
Source: American Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Original Articles: Thoracic Source Type: research
Conclusions Job strain is associated with a higher risk of incident CHD in Denmark. As we used a JEM, we can rule out reporting bias. However, under- or overestimation of associations is possible due to non-differential misclassification of job strain and residual confounding by socioeconomic position.byRugulies R, Framke E, S ørensen JK, Svane-Petersen AC, Alexanderson K, Bonde JP, Farrants K, Flachs EM, Magnusson Hanson LL, Nyberg ST, Kivimäki M, Madsen IEH. doi:10.5271/sjweh.3890
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Conclusions Job strain is associated with a higher risk of incident CHD in Denmark. As we used a JEM, we can rule out reporting bias. However, under- or overestimation of associations is possible due to non-differential misclassification of job strain and residual confounding by socioeconomic position. PMID: 32202306 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Authors: Tags: Scand J Work Environ Health Source Type: research
Artificial intelligence-based analysis of CT scans predicted people ’s risk of heart disease more accurately than current methods.
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Artificial intelligence (AI)-based assessment of body composition biomarkers...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: From lab to clinic: How AI can help AI enables screening of fracture risk from CT scans AI spots heart disease on CT lung screening exams AI accurately detects vertebral fractures on CT Can AI screen for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease?
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
This study aimed to assess the relationship between radiation dose and changes in the irradiated myocardial F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake after radiotherapy (RT) in breast cancer patients. The data of 55 patients with left and 48 patients with right breast cancer who underwent curative surgical resection and adjuvant three-dimensional conformal RT and staging (PET1), post-adjuvant chemotherapy (PET2), post-RT (PET3), and surveillance (PET4) FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were retrospectively reviewed. The median interval between PET1 and curative surgical resection, between the end of ...
Source: Clinical Genitourinary Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: J Clin Med Source Type: research
Artificial intelligence is making its way into health care, and one of its first stops is making sense of all of those scans that doctors order. Already, studies have shown that AI-based tools can, in some cases, pick out abnormal growths that could be cancerous tumors better than doctors can, mainly because digesting and synthesizing huge volumes of information is what AI does best. In a study published Feb. 14 in Circulation, researchers in the U.K. and the U.S. report that an AI program can reliably predict heart attacks and strokes. Kristopher Knott, a research fellow at the British Heart Foundation, and his team condu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Heart Disease Source Type: news
Loss of capillary density, and thus flow of blood through tissues, is a known feature of aging, though the causes of this change in tissue maintenance are far from completely explored. It is proposed to be quite important in loss of tissue function, particularly in organs with high metabolic demands, such as muscle and the brain. Researchers here provide evidence to suggest that this loss of capillary density is a noteworthy mediating mechanism linking the age-related impairment of heart function with the presence of chronic kidney disease. The latter is already known to correlate with impaired capillary structure in the h...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
If you have a CT heart scan score (also called coronary calcium score), what effect do statin cholesterol drugs have on stopping or slowing the increase in score? (Increasing scores pose increasing risk for heart attack and other cardiac events.) NONE. If you do nothing at all, the score increases by 25% per year, on average. If you take a statin drug, aspirin, and follow a low-fat diet, what my colleagues call “optimal medical therapy,” the score increases . . . 25% per year—no difference. Yet this is the “solution” that conventional doctors push on their patients, a “treatment” t...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open cholesterol coronary calcium ct scan do statin drugs reduce heart scan scores reduce coronary calcium reverse coronary calcium reverse heart disease undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
AbstractIn the era of next generation sequencing (NGS), genetic testing for inherited disorders identifies an ever-increasing number of variants whose pathogenicity remains unclear. These variants of uncertain significance (VUS) limit the reach of genetic testing in clinical practice. The VUS for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common familial heart disease, constitute over 60% of entries for missense variants shown in ClinVar database. We have studied a novel VUS (c.1809T>G-p.I603M) in the most frequently mutated gene in HCM,MYBPC3, which codes for cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBPC). Our determinatio...
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
More News: Cardiology | Health | Heart | Heart Disease | PET Scan