A pilot study using environmental screening to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Irish cattle herds

ConclusionsThe results highlight the importance of monitoring farm environments for Johne ’s disease. This disease is a growing concern for dairy and beef producers in Ireland, and sampling the farm environment may offer a useful means to rapidly screen for the presence of MAP. Non-pathogenic common enteric commensal and multiple-drug-resistantE. coli may contribute to AMR acting as a reservoir and transferring resistance to other species/pathogens in the environment.
Source: Irish Veterinary Journal - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research

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This study was aimed at assessing whether the repeated exposure of twelve strains of Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes to the alternative non-thermal decontamination techniques ultraviolet light (UV-C) and non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) may cause the emergence of variants showing an increased resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics (ampicillin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, tetracycline, erythromycin, vancomycin and colistin). UV-C and NTAP treatments were applied on the surface of inoculated BHI agar plates. Survivors were recovered and, after 24 hours growth ...
Source: Applied and Environmental Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Environ Microbiol Source Type: research
This study characterized Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and E. coli O157:H7 by collecting rectoanal mucosal swabs and fecal samples from 518 imported beef cattle at Jordan’s major abattoir. A unique 53 L. monocytogenes, 287 S. enterica, and 17 E. coli O157:H7 were isolated from 37, 120 and 9 different animals; respectively. The prevalence of S. enterica, L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 were 23.2% (95% CI, 19.7-27.0%), 7.1% (95% CI, 5.2-9.7%) and 1.7% (95% CI, 0.9-3.3%); respectively. All L. monocytogenes, all E. coli O157:H7 and 93.0% of S. enterica isolates resisted at least one antimicrobial clas...
Source: Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
ConclusionsWhen fed at approved dosages for typical durations, tylosin increases the proportion of macrolide-resistant enterococci in the cattle gastrointestinal tract, which could pose a zoonotic risk to human beef consumers. Feeding tylosin for short durations may mitigate the impact on macrolide-resistant enterococci and further studies are encouraged to determine the effect of minimizing or eliminating tylosin use in beef cattle. There may also be an impact on other bacteria and other antimicrobial resistances but additional details or data are needed to strengthen these comparisons. We encourage authors of antimicrobi...
Source: Preventive Veterinary Medicine - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Abstract Wild birds have been the focus of a great deal of research investigating the epidemiology of zoonotic bacteria and antimicrobial resistance in the environment. While enteric pathogens (e.g. Campylobacter, Salmonella, and E. coli O157:H7) and antimicrobial resistant bacteria of public health importance have been isolated from a wide variety of wild bird species, there is a considerable variation in the measured prevalence of a given microorganism from different studies. This variation may often reflect differences in certain ecological and biological factors such as feeding habits and immune status. Variat...
Source: Animal Health Research Reviews - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Anim Health Res Rev Source Type: research
This study characterized Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and E. coli O157:H7 by collecting rectoanal mucosal swabs and fecal samples from 518 imported beef cattle at Jordan's major abattoir. A unique 53 L. monocytogenes, 287 S. enterica, and 17 E. coli O157:H7 were isolated from 37, 120 and 9 different animals; respectively. The prevalence of S. enterica, L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 were 23.2 % (95 % CI, 19.7-27.0 %), 7.1 % (95 % CI, 5.2-9.7 %) and 1.7 % (95 % CI, 0.9-3.3 %); respectively. All L. monocytogenes, all E. coli O157:H7 and 93.0 % of S. enterica isolates resisted at least one antimicrobial ...
Source: Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases. - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis Source Type: research
te; T Abstract Bacteria within biofilms are more resistant to antibiotics and chemical agents than planktonic bacteria in suspension. Treatment of biofilm-associated infections inevitably involves high dosages and prolonged courses of antimicrobial agents; therefore, there is a potential risk of the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Due to the high prevalence of AMR and its association with biofilm formation, investigation of more effective anti-biofilm agents is required. From ancient times, herbs and spices have been used to preserve foods, and their antimicrobial, anti-biofilm and anti-quorum sensi...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Source: European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Published: 1/31/2020. Salmonella and campylobacter are becoming increasingly resistant to ciprofloxacin, one of the antibiotics of choice for treating infections caused by these bacteria. That conclusion is part of this 166-page report on antimicrobial resistance in zoonoses, released with the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which also presents some positive trends in the animal sector and includes key outcome indicators that will help European Union Member States assess their progress in reducing the use of antimicrobials and combat...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
ConclusionsOur current results demonstrated that LysSS can be a novel and promising antimicrobial agent against MRSA and MDR Gram-negative bacteria includingA. baumannii and P. aeruginosa.
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 January 2020Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial ResistanceAuthor(s): Shengzhi Yang, Wenwen Deng, Shuliang Liu, Xiumei Yu, Ghulam Raza Mustafa, Shujuan Chen, Li He, Xiaoling Ao, Yong Yang, Kang Zhou, Bei Li, Xinfeng Han, Xuebin Xu, Likou ZouAbstractObjectivesLittle attention has been paid to heavy metal resistance (HMR) to pathogenic bacteria with the wide use of heavy metals as feed additives in food animals. Therefore, present study was constructed to investigate the presence of HMR in Escherichia coli and Salmonella, and its correlation with disinfectant resistance genes (DRGs) a...
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Jia Huang Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) causes millions of illnesses every year, threatening the success of lifesaving antibiotic therapy and, thus, public health. To examine the rise and spread of antimicrobial resistance around the world, our study performs a multivariate statistical analysis of antimicrobial resistance gene data from eight different countries: the US, the UK, China, Brazil, Mexico, Canada, Australia, and South Africa. Multi-dimensional data points were projected onto a two-dimensional plane using principal component analysis and organized into a dendrogram utilizing hierarchical clustering to ...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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