Topical application of temperature-sensitive caerin 1.1 and 1.9 gel inhibits TC-1 tumor growth in mice.

Topical application of temperature-sensitive caerin 1.1 and 1.9 gel inhibits TC-1 tumor growth in mice. Am J Transl Res. 2020;12(1):191-202 Authors: Ma B, Yuan J, Chen S, Huang K, Wang Q, Ma J, Lin R, Zhang L, Zhou Y, Wang T, Walton SF, Pan X, Chen G, Wang Y, Ni G, Liu X Abstract Genital warts, which are one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), result from persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), especially subtypes 6 or 11. Topical application of 5% imiquimod cream is currently recommended as a first-line treatment choice for genital warts, but the clearance and patient compliance rates remain less than sufficient. In the current study, we developed a temperature-sensitive gel that contains the host-defense peptides caerin 1.1 and 1.9, which were originally isolated from Australian tree frogs of the genus Litoria. Growth of HPV16 E6/E7-transformed TC-1 cells was inhibited in vitro and in vivo following injection of the tumor with the caerin gel in a TC-1 tumor mouse model. Furthermore, when the caerin gel was topically applied, the inhibitory effect remained, and T, NK cells were attracted to the tumor site. In addition, the gel maintained a similar level of bioactivity after incubation at room temperature for 30 days. Our results suggest that this caerin gel, following further optimization, may provide an alternative method for the management of genital warts. PMID: 32051748 [PubMed]
Source: American Journal of Translational Research - Category: Research Tags: Am J Transl Res Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 18 February 2020Source: Biosensors and BioelectronicsAuthor(s): Ziqing Yu, Weiyuan Lyu, Mengchao Yu, Qian Wang, Haijun Qu, Rustem F. Ismagilov, Xu Han, Dongmei Lai, Feng ShenAbstractHuman papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, and persistent HPV infection can cause warts and even cancer. Nucleic acid analysis of HPV viral DNA can be very informative for the diagnosis and monitoring of HPV. Digital nucleic acid analysis, such as digital PCR and digital isothermal amplification, can provide sensitive detection and precise quantification of ...
Source: Biosensors and Bioelectronics - Category: Biotechnology Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted virus. The high-risk HPV types (i.e., HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59) are considered to be the main etiological agents of genital tract cancers, such as cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, and anal cancers, and of a subset of head and neck cancers. Three prophylactic HPV vaccines are available that are bivalent (vs. HPV16, 18), tetravalent (vs. HPV6, 11, 16, 18), and non-avalent (vs. HPV6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33,45, 52, 58). All of these vaccines are based on recombinant DNA technology, and they are prepared from the purified L1 protein that s...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract HPV is still the most common sexually transmitted infection, leading to the onset of many disorders while causing an increase in direct and indirect health costs. High Risk (HR) HPV is the primary cause of invasive cervical cancer and contributes significantly to the development of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. The introduction of universal HPV vaccination has led to a significant reduction in vaccine-targeted HPV infections, cross-protective genotypes, precancerous lesions and anogenital warts. Despite the several limitations of HPV vaccination programs, including vaccine type specificity, differ...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Background Studies in countries with high human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage have demonstrated marked reductions in anogenital wart (AGW) incidence. Our goal was to assess the impact of HPV vaccination in a population with suboptimal coverage by comparing AGW incidence trends in the years before and after vaccine introduction. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of AGW incidence trends using an ecologic study design among 11- through 39-year-olds enrolled at Kaiser Permanente Northwest. We defined incidence as the proportion of persons who had a new AGW diagnosis for each calendar year in the pr...
Source: Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Category: Sexual Medicine Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
This is a public health success story. A landmark report on the effectiveness of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (4vHP) in the U.S. is now a matter of medical record. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S., with nearly 80 million people infected with some type of HPV at some point in their lives [1]. About 14 million Americans, including teens, become infected each year [2]. HPV causes genital warts and is associated with an estimated 33,700 newly diagnosed cancers every year in the U.S.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Genital human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection. It may be asymptomatic or manifests as benign or malignant lesions. The pathogenesis of HPV infection is not completely elucidated; in most cases spontaneous viral clearance occurs. In our study we have investigated the effect of HPV infection on the balance between oxidants and antioxidants in patients with genital warts. We have determined the serum levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), total oxidant status (TAS) and total antioxidant status (TOS) in 15 patients with genital warts and 28 healthy subjects.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Innate Immunity and Inflammation Source Type: research
AbstractIn the U.S. there is an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). One of the most prevalent STIs is the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Certain high risk strains of HPV are believed to cause virtually all cervical cancers, over 90% of anal cancers, 70% of oropharyngeal cancers, and the majority of anal  genital warts. HPV is preventable through vaccination and is available for both men and women. Several educational interventions have been employed, yet baseline awareness and knowledge related to HPV and 9vHPV remains relatively low among young men. What is not known is the most effective method for provid...
Source: Journal of Community Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
Anal warts develop due to the human papillomavirus. They can cause itching, bleeding, and other symptoms. Treatment may involve topical medications, liquid nitrogen, or surgical removal. Learn more here.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sexual Health / STDs Source Type: news
An analysis covering 66 million young people has found plummeting rates of precancerous lesions and genital warts after vaccination against the human papillomavirus.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Women and Girls Vaccination and Immunization Cervical Cancer Sexually Transmitted Diseases Warts Gardasil (Vaccine) Third World and Developing Countries Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Lancet, The (J Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the need for educational campaigns regarding HPV infection, its potential as a cervical cancer agent and the forms of prevention available.RESUMO OBJETIVO: O papilomav írus humano (HPV) é o vírus sexualmente transmissível mais prevalente no mundo, estando a infecção por este agente associada a um aumento do risco do câncer de colo uterino. A abordagem mais eficaz para o controle desse tipo de câncer continua sendo a triagem por meio do exame preventivo (Pa panicolaou). Este estudo analisa o conhecimento de estudantes universit&aacut...
Source: Revista da Associacao Medica Brasileira - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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