Aptamers in nanostructure-based electrochemical biosensors for cardiac biomarkers and cancer biomarkers: A review.

Aptamers in nanostructure-based electrochemical biosensors for cardiac biomarkers and cancer biomarkers: A review. Biosens Bioelectron. 2020 Mar 15;152:112018 Authors: Negahdary M Abstract Heart disease (especially myocardial infarction (MI)) and cancer are major causes of death. Recently, aptasensors with the applying of different nanostructures have been able to provide new windows for the early and inexpensive detection of these deadly diseases. Early, inexpensive, and accurate diagnosis by portable devices, especially aptasensors can increase the likelihood of survival as well as significantly reduce the cost of treatment. In this review, recent studies based on the designed aptasensors for the diagnosis of these diseases were collected, ordered, and reviewed. The biomarkers for the diagnosis of each disease were discussed separately. The primary constituent elements of these aptasensors including, analyte, aptamer sequence, type of nanostructure, diagnostic technique, analyte detection range, and limit of detection (LOD), were evaluated and compared. PMID: 32056737 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biosensors and Bioelectronics - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Biosens Bioelectron Source Type: research

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