Group pain neuroscience education and dance in institutionalized older adults with chronic pain: a case series study.

Conclusion: Results suggest pain neuroscience education is a feasible intervention and when combined with dance may have a positive impact on pain intensity. PMID: 32053057 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Physiother Theory Pract Source Type: research

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What we call a disease matters. It matters to the person because a diagnosis is a marker: this problem is known, it’s recognised, it’s real (Mengshoel, Sim, Ahlsen &Madden, 2017). It matters to the clinician, particularly medical practitioners, but also those clinicians working within a largely “disease-oriented” framework (for example, physiotherapists, osteopaths) (Haskins, Osmotherly, Rivett, 2015; Kennedy, 2017). It matters also to insurance companies, or funding providers – who is in, and who is out. The diagnostic label itself hides a great many assumptions. The ways in which diag...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Assessment Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
Conclusion. Our findings support that the electronic version of the RMDQ, TSK, CES-D, and BPAQ can be administered in clinical and research settings for assessment of patients with chronic LBP. Nevertheless, electronic version of the NRS for assessment of pain intensity should not be used interchangeably in clinical practice in patients with chronic LBP. Level of Evidence: 3
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH Source Type: research
Once you begin to dip your toes into psychological therapies, it doesn’t take long before you begin to see TLAs all over the place. So today I’m going to post on two things: some of the TLAs, and why or how we might consider using these approaches in pain rehabilitation. The first one is CBT, or cognitive behavioural therapy. CBT grew out of two movements: behaviour therapy (Skinner and the pigeons, rats and all that behaviour modification stuff), and cognitive therapy (Ellis and Beck and the “cognitive triad” – more on this later). When the two approaches to therapy are combined, we have c...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Clinical reasoning Cognitive behavioral therapy Coping strategies Interdisciplinary teams Occupational therapy Physiotherapy Professional topics Psychology Research Science in practice Source Type: blogs
Today’s post is another one where there’s very little to guide my thinking… Have you ever wondered why we read so much research looking at the characteristics of the people who look for help with their pain – yet not nearly as much about us, the people who do the helping? There are studies about us – thanks Ben – and others! (Darlow, Dowell, Baxter, Mathieson, Perr &Dean, 2013; Farin, Gramm &Schmidt, 2013; Parsons, Harding, Breen, Foster, Pincus, Vogel &Underwood, 2007). We know some things are helpful for people with pain: things like listening capabilities (Matthias, Ba...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice attitudes beliefs communication nocebo Source Type: blogs
ConclusionAlthough perceived physical overload at work was not associated with pain intensity in patients with chronic LBP at 6-month follow-up, we identified a significant association between perceived physical overload related to postures of the trunk and positions of the arms with disability at 6-month follow-up.Graphical abstractThese slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.
Source: European Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Conclusions: The MFT-S3-Check could not find a significant difference in postural stability between the back pain and nonback pain group in the study setting. Postural stability improved after treatment.
Source: Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques - Category: Surgery Tags: PRIMARY RESEARCH Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Adding interferential current stimulation to exercise resulted in better immediate outcome across a range of measures. PMID: 31007047 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Clin Rehabil Source Type: research
Our definitions of pain matter more to researchers and people who like to philosophise about pain than to people experiencing pain. At the same time, definitions do matter because when the IASP definition of pain was first established, the distinction between the neurobiological underpinnings of pain – and the experience – was clear. And this matters because neurobiology is only part of the picture. (Chekka &Benzon, 2018; Cohen, Quintner &van Rysewyk, 2018; Reuter, Sienhold &Sytsma, 2018; Tesarz &Eich, 2017; Williams &Craig, 2016)The idea of “tribes” in pain and pain management i...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Pain conditions Professional topics diagnosis Education interprofessional lived experience silos social sociology tribes Source Type: blogs
If you are one of the more than 100 million Americans suffering with chronic pain, you know how desperate you can get searching for relief. For constant or chronic pain, sometimes knowing that you can only get temporary relief from medications sits at the back of your brain and sets up pain anticipation. Shouldn’t there be a better way, an approach or approaches that don’t rely on pharmaceutical drugs to combat pain? According to new research, there are some new pain relief methods that look very promising to do just that. Treatment from Strangers Mat Provide Unexpected Pain Relief It may seem counter-intuitiv...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Chronic Pain Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Psychology Research Treatment Source Type: blogs
Conclusion. TENS and IFC therapies are effective in the treatment of CNP patients. However, they have no additional benefit or superiority over NSE. Level of Evidence: 2
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Randomized Trial Source Type: research
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