Sleep, Pain and Quality of Life in Chronic Pain Patients

Conditions:   Chronic Pain;   Insomnia Interventions:   Behavioral: Education;   Behavioral: Web-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (iCBT) Sponsors:   Helsinki University Central Hospital;   Helsinki University Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials

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Abstract Sleep and opioid medications used to treat insomnia and chronic pain are associated with adverse side effects (falls and cognitive disturbance). Although behavioural treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) and pain (CBT-P) improve sleep and clinical pain, their effects on sleep and opioid medication use are unclear. In this secondary analysis of published trial data, we investigated whether CBT-I and CBT-P reduced reliance on sleep/opioid medication in patients with fibromyalgia and insomnia (FMI). Patients with FMI (n = 113, Mage  = 53.0, SD = 10...
Source: Journal of Sleep Research - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: J Sleep Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence to support the superiority of sound therapy for tinnitus over waiting list control, placebo or education/information with no device. There is insufficient evidence to support the superiority or inferiority of any of the sound therapy options (hearing aid, sound generator or combination hearing aid) over each other. The quality of evidence for the reported outcomes, assessed using GRADE, was low. Using a combination device, hearing aid or sound generator might result in little or no difference in tinnitus symptom severity.Future research into the effectiveness of sound therapy in patients w...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
I’ve recently completed two posts on assessing sleep problems in people experiencing persistent pain, and today I turn my attention to strategies for managing sleep problems – without medication. Why without medication? Because to date there are no medications for insomnia that don’t require a ‘weaning off’ period, during which time people often find their original sleep problems emerge once again… I’m not completely against medications for sleep or pain – but I think they need to be used with care and full disclosure about the effects, side-effects, and the need to eventual...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Cognitive skills Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice biopsychosocial CBT Health se Source Type: blogs
Introduction: Both chronic pain and sleep disturbances are common and potentially very disabling problems (Smith and Haythornthwaite, 2004). At least 6 % of the population suffer from chronic insomnia (Ohayon, 2002), and the prevalence of longstanding pain is 19 % (Breivik et al., 2006). However, the prevalence of insomnia among individuals with chronic pain seems to be around 50% (Sivertsen et al., 2009). Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown effective for both primary and comorbid insomnia (Morgenthaler et al., 2006), among other for people with chronic pain (Tang, 2009).
Source: Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Insomnia Source Type: research
By Alex Fradera “In the dark, in the quiet, in the lonely stillness, the aggrieved struggle to rescue sleep from vigilance.” This arresting sentence introduces a new review of insomnia in Behaviour Research and Therapy that addresses a troubling fact observed in sleep labs across the world: poor sleep is not sufficient to make people consider themselves to have the condition… and poor sleep may not even be necessary. The paper, by Kenneth Lichstein at the University of Alabama, explores the implications of “Insomnia Identity”: how it contributes to health problems, and may be an obstacle...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental health Sleep and dreaming Source Type: blogs
We report here an overview of the Depression Inventory Development initiative, including results of the third iteration of items assessing symptoms related to anhedonia, cognition, fatigue, general malaise, motivation, anxiety, negative thinking, pain and appetite. The strategies adopted from the Depression Inventory Development program, as an empirically driven and collaborative process for scale development, have provided the foundation to develop and validate measurement tools in other therapeutic areas as well. Introduction The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD)[1] and Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rati...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Depression Mood Disorders Patient Assessment Psychiatry Review Scales Trial Methodology depressive symptoms item response theory major depressive disorder rating scales Source Type: research
People suffering chronicpain due to conditions such asarthritis could benefit from cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to help them get better sleep. This is according to a new study from the University of Warwick, which has demonstrated the impact that certain modes of thinking can have on sleeping habits among chronic pain patients, as well as highlighting ways this problem could be addressed. The impact of negative thinking on sleep Published in the Journal of ClinicalSleep Medicine, the research centred on the development of a new scale to measure beliefs about sleep and pain in long-term pain patients, while also exam...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news
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