Early Impressions of Star Trek: Picard

After seeing the first 4 episodes of the new series Star Trek: Picard, I think it’s just okay so far. It seems to be setting up a potentially interesting story arc, but in other ways I find it disappointing. The acting feels a bit off, as if Picard has consumed a few too many cups of Earl Grey and is overly caffeinated. It feels more like the dorky movie version of Picard while I was hoping for more of the chill version of his character from The Next Generation. It doesn’t feel like a believable future version of Picard, at least not yet. I also remind myself that Star Trek: The Next Generation took a while to get its footing, especially with Deanna Troi’s first season character, who’d cry whenever they ran out of chocolate. The main thing I dislike about ST: Picard is the show’s approach to visual editing, with camera angles switching every 1-2 seconds during many scenes. I can understand doing this during fast-paced action scenes, but it happens even when characters are just sitting around talking. It feels like they’re following some odd rule to keep the camera moving at all times, so when it’s not cutting around rapidly, it’s panning or doing the Ken Burns effect. This is visually annoying. It’s harder to pay attention to what’s being said and to absorb a setting when the visuals are flipping around like someone is playing Whack-a-mole with the camera selection. It makes the show feel more shallow, li...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

The hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis acts to release cortisol into the blood stream, as cortisol calls the body into action to combat stress. When high amounts of cortisol interact with the hypothalamus, the HPA axis will slow down its activity. The amygdala detects stress, while the prefrontal cortex regulates our reactions to stress. Source: Bezdek K and Telzer E (2017) Have No Fear, the Brain is Here! How Your Brain Responds to Stress. Front. Young Minds. 5:71. doi: 10.3389/frym.2017.00071 _______ [Editor’s note: Continued from yesterday’s Exploring the human brain and how it responds to...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness #WorldHealthDay brain burnout cognition Cortisol GAS General Adaptation Syndrome homeostasis memory neurobiology neurological exhaustion Stress Source Type: blogs
In this paper a systematic literature review on safety and risk assessment at ports storing and transferring liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been performed. In addition, regulations, standards and guidelines for assessing hazards and risks of LNG storage a...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
This study investigates chemical accidents that occurred between January ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
Managing Wildland-Urban-Interface (WUI) fires is a challenging task due to the inherent complexity of the WUI environment. To ensure the success of strategies for the protection of population and structures, safety measures have to be implemented at differ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
This study addresses the question of risk perception among firefighters of four Spanish-speaking countries (Argentina, Chile, Ecuador and Spain). It identifies (i) the conditions that generate high and low risk perception. Moreover, the study analyses (ii)...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
Considering the differences in the individual characteristics of pedestrians and the influence factors of buildings, we proposed a safety evacuation model for limited spaces. Evacuation efficiency, bottleneck area density, escape route characteristics, and...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
Burn patients receiving aggressive fluid resuscitation are at risk of developing orbital compartment syndrome (OCS). This condition results in elevated orbital pressures and can lead to rapid permanent vision loss. Risk factors and monitoring frequency for...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
The chemical industry is one of the major industries driving the Korean economy. However, increased chemical use accompanied by obsolete equipment and careless management has promoted the occurrence of chemical accidents. Therefore, to develop a preventive...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
Conditions:   Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder;   Posttraumatic Stress Disorder;   Reminder Focused Positive Psychiatry;   Neuroinflammation Interventions:   Behavioral: RFPP;   Behavioral: TFCBT Sponsors:   University of California, Los Angeles;   Kern Medical;   American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry. Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Intervention:   Other: Neuropsychological and attachment/parenting assessment Sponsors:   Queen Fabiola Children's University Hospital;   The Belgian Kids' Fund Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
More News: ADHD | Blogging | Brain | Burns | Chocolate | Jobs | Lessons | Men | Neurology | Overdose | Psychology | Sports Medicine | Teaching | Universities & Medical Training