Mayo Clinic study looks at changes in outcomes for coronary revascularization

(Mayo Clinic) The most common type of heart disease -- coronary artery disease -- affects 6.7% of adults and accounts for 20% of 2 in 10 deaths of adults under age 65. The condition builds over time as inflammation and cholesterol-containing plaques settle in the heart's arteries, where they can eventually cause narrowing and blockages that lead to a heart attack.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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By HANS DUVEFELT, MD Healthcare today, in the broadest sense, is not a benevolent giant that wraps its powerful arms around the sick and vulnerable. It is a world of opposing forces such as Government public health ambitions and more or less unfettered market ambitions by hospitals and downright profiteering by some of the middlemen who stand between doctors and patients, such as insurers, Pharmacy Benefits Managers, EMR vendors and other technology companies. Within healthcare there is also a growing, more or less money-focused sector of paramedicine, promoting “alternative” belief systems, some of which...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt Healthcare system Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, the recently demonstrated protective effects of NMN treatment on neurovascular function can be attributed to multifaceted sirtuin-mediated anti-aging changes in the neurovascular transcriptome. Our present findings taken together with the results of recent studies using mitochondria-targeted interventions suggest that mitochondrial rejuvenation is a critical mechanism to restore neurovascular health and improve cerebral blood flow in aging. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling as a Point of Intervention to Spur Greater Neural Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/wnt-%ce%b2-catenin-sig...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The clinical work on lowering blood cholesterol that has taken place over recent years has demonstrated that if there is a lower limit beyond which low cholesterol levels become harmful, then that limit is very low indeed. Certainly below 10% of the normal human level. There are a number of uncommon mutations that produce individuals with up to half of the normal amount of blood cholesterol, people who exhibit significantly reduced risk of cardiovascular disease as a result of this difference from the norm. This is all quite interesting: why did we evolve to have the blood cholesterol that we do, if we need only a small fr...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Atherosclerosis is a condition characterized by the growth of fatty lesions, atheromas, in blood vessel walls. This narrows and weakens blood vessels, leading to heart disease, and then ultimately the fatal rupture or blockage of a major vessel that causes a heart attack or stroke. This degeneration of the arteries is a universal process. It occurs to various degrees in every older person, and kills perhaps a sixth of humanity at the present time. The only reason that it doesn't kill everybody is that other degenerative process of aging manage to get in first, that data suggesting that this is most likely only a matter of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
HEART ATTACKS are often caused by coronary heart disease, and risk of developing this is increased by a high-fat diet, high cholesterol and being overweight or obese. Research in the past has found a link between eating certain foods and heart disease, but a new study has confirmed a popular breakfast food is not as bad as first though.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
A risk-based prevention strategy is the most widely accepted approach to guide clinician-patient decision-making for prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). According to this approach, the intensity of prevention efforts is matched to the estimated risk of the individual. American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines currently recommend pooled cohort equations for initial risk assessment, which integrate age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking status, and treatment for hypertension and diabetes to provide race- and sex-specific estimates of ...
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disorder of insulin resistance — a reduced sensitivity to the action of insulin — which leads to high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. Approximately 12% of American adults have T2D, and more than one-third of Americans have prediabetes, a precursor to T2D. This is a major public health concern, as T2D dramatically increases risk for heart disease, including heart attacks, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure. The development and progression of T2D is affected by many factors. Some, such as a person’s race/ethnicity, age, and gender cannot be modified. Others, including...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs
Authors: Alwi I Abstract Over more than two decades, the concept of atherosclerosis has developed and lead to inflammatory hypothesis. Inflammation plays an important role on pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and coronary heart disease (CHD), including acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although the management of ACS has been demonstrated to be beneficial for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (such as using statin and aspirin) and also seemed to have positive effect on inflammation, the identification of effective management, specifically targeting inflammation, has been not been comprehensively understood....
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
If you have a CT heart scan score (also called coronary calcium score), what effect do statin cholesterol drugs have on stopping or slowing the increase in score? (Increasing scores pose increasing risk for heart attack and other cardiac events.) NONE. If you do nothing at all, the score increases by 25% per year, on average. If you take a statin drug, aspirin, and follow a low-fat diet, what my colleagues call “optimal medical therapy,” the score increases . . . 25% per year—no difference. Yet this is the “solution” that conventional doctors push on their patients, a “treatment” t...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open cholesterol coronary calcium ct scan do statin drugs reduce heart scan scores reduce coronary calcium reverse coronary calcium reverse heart disease undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
In this interview with Dr. Lee Hooper we find out more about this new Cochrane review -Omega-3 fatty acids for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseaseTell us about this Cochrane ReviewThere is a great deal of public belief in the cardiovascular benefits of omega-3 fats.   Intakes of long-chain omega-3 fats in the US are higher from dietary supplements than foods.  But public health advice differs across countries. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK encourages people to eat oily fish intake (the major source of long-chain omega-3 f ats) but discourages supple...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
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