What ’s the best way to manage agitation related to dementia?

You notice your loved one becoming more forgetful. She cannot recall her visit with her granddaughters yesterday. She claims she took her medications this morning, yet you find them untouched in her pill case. You wonder how this mild-mannered woman has become so angry, so quickly. She is often frightened now, disoriented, and unpredictable. Yet she still remembers every detail of your wedding day, the names of your four children, and how to play her favorite piano pieces. When you sing together, time temporarily stands still. Your loved one received a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Nights are the hardest time for her. You worry about her safety when she wanders through the house. She almost broke the door last week; you can tell her arm still hurts when you bathe her. She resists and yells at you when you take her to the bathroom. She has started to show behavioral symptoms of dementia. Aggression and agitation in dementia Behavioral and psychological symptoms are very common in dementia, and affect up to 90% of people living with dementia. In addition to memory changes, people with dementia may experience agitation, psychosis, anxiety, depression, and apathy. These behavioral symptoms often lead to greater distress than memory changes. When people with dementia become agitated or aggressive, doctors often prescribe medications to control their behaviors in spite of the known risks of serious side effects. The most frequently prescribed medication classes for agitat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Caregiving Healthy Aging Memory Source Type: blogs

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Most people know that drinking alcohol to excess isn’t good for you, but does it mean you are an alcoholic? People who drink sometimes test limits and boundaries which could lead to binge drinking, whether intentional or unintentional. How can you tell if you’ve crossed the line between binge drinking and alcohol use disorder, and the answer to “is a binge drinker an alcoholic”? What Technically Is a Binge Drinker? The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism defines binge drinking as a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels to 0.08 g/dL. This typically o...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Recovery Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility binge binge drinking Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsAED use was common in nursing homes, with gabapentin most commonly used (presumably for pain). That multiple comorbidities were associated with AED use underscores the need for future studies to investigate the safety and effectiveness of AED use in nursing home residents.
Source: Drugs and Aging - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Drinking alcohol causes damage to your health in both the short term and long term, even for moderate drinkers. For individuals who suffer from addiction to alcohol and frequently drink in excess, these risks become higher. Knowing the risks of drinking alcohol is important to help avoid drinking to excess and reduce the likelihood of these risks. Short-Term Risks of Drinking Alcohol There are many short-term risks that occur when drinking alcohol. These risks can happen to anyone, including individuals suffering from alcohol use disorder, or individuals who are drinking for the very first time. Injuries When you drink al...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility alcohol use risks Source Type: blogs
Preoperative and postoperative mental health status (MHS) of total joint arthroplasty patients can affect immediate and long-term outcomes following surgery. Alterations in MHS can be acute or chronic. The most common etiologies include acute changes due to (1) delirium or stroke, (2) movement disorders (Alzheimer dementia, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy), and (3) mood/behavior disorders (major depressive disorder, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia). Across etiologies, alterations in MHS are associated with worse clinical/patient-reported outcomes and greater total cost of care. Prevention via pharm...
Source: Techniques in Orthopaedics - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Symposium Source Type: research
This study investigated associations between risk factors and late-life cognitive decline on a global scale, including comparisons between ethno-regional groups. Methods and findingsWe harmonized longitudinal data from 20 population-based cohorts from 15 countries over 5 continents, including 48,522 individuals (58.4% women) aged 54 –105 (mean = 72.7) years and without dementia at baseline. Studies had 2–15 years of follow-up. The risk factors investigated were age, sex, education, alcohol consumption, anxiety, apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (APOE*4) status, atrial fibrillation, blood pressure and pulse pre...
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
This article highlights some of these challenges in the design of lifestyle studies in PD, and suggests a more coordinated international effort is required, including ongoing longitudinal observational studies. In combination with pharmaceutical treatments, healthy lifestyle behaviors may slow the progression of PD, empower patients, and reduce disease burden. For optimal care of people with PD, it is important to close this gap in current knowledge and discover whether such associations exist. Introduction Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related complex progressive neurodegenerative disorder, with key p...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this study, C57BL/6 and Tau KO mice were used. For Tau KO mice, Western blot results of anti-Tau protein specific antibodies showed that Tau KO mice had no positive bands at 50–55 kDa (Tau protein position), while C57BL/6 mice normally expressed Tau protein (Figure 1).FIGURE 1Figure 1 Tau knockout (KO) mice did not express Tau protein.The C57BL/6 mice exhibited depressive behaviors, including anxiety, anhedonia, and depression-like after CUMS, and ketamine treatment alleviated their depressive behavior. Tau KO mice did not exhibit depressive behavior after CUMS. After treatment with ketamine at the same dose, ther...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
DiscussionAs detailed above, the “elements” in both a classical and a contemporary sense have effects on our mental health and are potentially modifiable aspects that can be harnessed as therapeutic interventions. The most robust interventional evidence currently available shows tentative support for several use of the elements via horticultural and nature-exposure therapy, green exercise/physical activity, sauna and heat therapy, balneotherapy, and breathing exercises. It should be noted that, in many cases, these interventions were not studied in definitive diagnosed psychiatric disorders and thus it is prema...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In this study, we assessed the relationship of ΔHR (difference between resting HR and HRt) and recovery from SRC. Using a retrospective cohort design, we compared acutely (30 days) in RG (p = 0.01) and PG (p = 0.04). A ΔHR of ≤50 bpm on the BCTT is 73% sensitive and 78% specific for predicting prolonged recovery in concussed adolescents who were prescribed the current standard of care (i.e., cognitive and physical rest). Introduction Sport-related concussion (SRC), a type of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a significant public health concern (1, 2). Concussion is defined as reversible neurolog...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Wei Li1†, Wei-Min Xiao1†, Yang-Kun Chen1*, Jian-Feng Qu1, Yong-Lin Liu1, Xue-Wen Fang2, Han-Yu Weng1 and Gen-Pei Luo11Department of Neurology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, China2Department of Radiology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, ChinaBackground: Anxiety is prevalent after a stroke. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of poststroke anxiety (PSA) remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and neuroimaging risk factors for development of PSA and examine the effects of PSA on activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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