IMAGES: What New Coronavirus Looks Like Under The Microscope

The images were made using scanning and transmission electron microscopes at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.(Image credit: NIAID-RML)
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(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) The experimental antiviral remdesivir successfully prevented disease in rhesus macaques infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), according to a new study from National Institutes of Health scientists. Remdesivir prevented disease when administered before infection and improved the condition of macaques when given after the animals already were infected.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
China's coronavirus outbreak poses a"very grave threat for the rest of the world" and should be viewed as"Public Enemy Number 1," the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Tuesday.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Public Health & Prevention News Source Type: news
Experts say 41% of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 may have been exposed in the hospital and almost one third of patients were healthcare professionals likely exposed while at work.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
In February 2020 the nature of the 2019-nCoV outbreak is still slowly coming into focus but it appears to be acting more like bad pandemic influenza (efficient spread, overall lower mortality) than like SARS (less efficient spread, overall higher mortality). Anthony Fauci, MD, of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) discusses the latest developments with JAMA Editor in Chief Howard Bauchner. Coronavirus Resource Center
Source: JAMA Author Interviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: podcasts
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that as of Feb. 5, 2020, there were no new coronavirus cases within the United States, leaving the number of confirmed cases at 11.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
A WHO-led international team of experts could go to China as early as this week to investigate the coronavirus outbreak, as agreed between the WHO chief and Chinese President Xi Jinping, and could include U.S. experts, a WHO spokesman said on Monday.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Public Health & Prevention News Source Type: news
A report purporting to describe asymptomatic transmission in Germany has come under fire. But many experts still believe it ’s happening.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Respiratory Diseases Epidemics Medicine and Health Harvard University Koch, Robert, Institute National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases New England Journal of Medicine World Health Organization Bavaria Source Type: news
While the threat of the new coronavirus in the United States remains limited, a network of U.S. government agencies are already furiously ramping up efforts to contain the disease, should an outbreak occur. “We are working to keep the risk low,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, who is leading the federal government’s response, at a press conference Friday. So far, the overwhelming number of new cases of the virus, which originated in Wuhan, China, remain in China. There are only 11 confirmed cases in the U.S. The good news, some officials and infectious disease experts tell TIME, is t...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
At a time when many are worried about the new coronavirus, the CDC warns citizens not to let their guard down about influenza, saying flu season could still continue for weeks.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
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