Established and emerging factors affecting the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common chronic liver disease affecting approximately 25% of the global population. Although a majority of NAFLD patients will never experience liver-related symptoms it is estimated that 5 –10% will develop cirrhosis-related complications with risk of death or need for liver transplantation. NAFLD is closely associated with cardiovascular disease and components of the metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD is not uncommon in lean individuals and may in these subjects represent a differe nt entity with separate pathophysiological mechanisms involved implying a higher risk for development of end-stage liver disease.
Source: Metabolism - Clinical and Experimental - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research

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atore Petta The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly becoming the most common cause of chronic liver disease as well as the first cause of liver transplantation. NAFLD is commonly associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and this is the most important reason why it is extremely difficult to treat this disease bearing in mind the enormous amount of interrelationships between the liver and other systems in maintaining the metabolic health. The treatment of NAFLD is a key point to prevent NASH progression to advanced fibrosis, to prevent cirrhosis and to prevent the development of its hepatic complicatio...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Authors: Tong J, Guo JJ Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common chronic liver disease worldwide and also become an emerging risk factor for liver-related complications, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The liver-related burden of NASH is likely to increase and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is probably to be the leading indication for liver transplantation by 2020, as a consequence of increased disease prevalence and of the lack of an effective treatment. The first step in the NAFLD development is represented by fat accumulation in the liver, a conditio...
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
Authors: Alswat KA, Fallatah HI, Al-Judaibi B, Elsiesy HA, Al-Hamoudi WK, Qutub AN, Alturaify N, Al-Osaimi A Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major national and international health burden. It is one of the most common liver diseases worldwide and the most common cause of abnormal liver enzymes in many developed countries. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is also known as an important cause of cryptogenic cirrhosis and second leading cause for liver transplantation. It is commonly associated with metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the progressive phenotype of NAFLD. ...
Source: Saudi Medical Journal - Category: Middle East Health Tags: Saudi Med J Source Type: research
Authors: Laursen TL, Hagemann CA, Wei C, Kazankov K, Thomsen KL, Knop FK, Grønbæk H Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasingly recognized as a significant liver disease, and it covers the disease spectrum from simple steatosis with a risk of development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to fibrosis, subsequent cirrhosis, end-stage liver failure, and liver cancer with a potential need for liver transplantation. NAFLD and NASH are closely related to obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The role of gut hormones, especially glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), i...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly common cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and is on trajectory to become the most frequent indication for liver transplantation in the United States,1,2 however therapeutic options are limited. While NAFLD is recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic dysfunction, it also portends an increased risk for incident diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome suggesting a complex bidirectional relationship.3,4
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsNAFLD could be dealt with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, preventing its progression into cirrhosis. SG can be performed in patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome, with NAFLD showing satisfactory results 12  months after surgery. NAFLD should be a formal indication for bariatric surgery.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Abstract Obesity and metabolic syndrome are considered as responsible for a condition known as the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease that goes from simple accumulation of triglycerides to hepatic inflammation and may progress to cirrhosis. Patients with obesity also have an increased risk of primary liver malignancies and increased body mass index is a predictor of decompensation of liver cirrhosis. Sarcopenic obesity confers a risk of physical impairment and disability that is significantly higher than the risk induced by each of the two conditions alone as it has been shown to be an independent risk factor for c...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as the presence of hepatic fat accumulation after the exclusion of other causes of hepatic steatosis, including other causes of liver disease, excessive alcohol consumption, and other conditions that may lead to hepatic steatosis. NAFLD encompasses a broad clinical spectrum ranging from nonalcoholic fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the world and NASH may soon become the most common indication for liver transplantation. On...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Authors: Germani G, Becchetti C Abstract Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome (MS) [1], and it is defined by the presence of steatosis in>5% of hepatocytes, according to histological analysis or detected by specific proton density fat fraction obtained MRI. The term NAFLD covers two pathologically distinct conditions: non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which can have similar clinical presentation, but with different prognosis. Both conditions can lastly lead to the development of cirrhosis. End stage liver-...
Source: Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol Source Type: research
As our waistlines thicken and our activity levels decrease, another chronic illness threatens to disturb our comfortable lifestyles. And, because it ’s relatively unknown, diagnosis comes as a shock to patients, who usually associate liver disease with heavy consumption of alcohol.Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an advanced form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), where fat accumulates in the liver. It is most commonly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and/or genetic polymorphisms, and is aggravated by inflammation and fibrosis.  First identified in the 1980s, its ...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
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