The Future of Health Care in Rwanda Starts with a Strong Government Partnership

By Samson Radeny, Chief of party, Ingobyi Project, Rwanda ; Katherine Seaton, Editorial Officer Photo by Charles Harris for IntraHealth International.February 13, 2020Just a decade ago, Rwanda struggled to provide high-quality health services. But when the Millennium and Sustainable Development Goals pushed for change, Rwanda was focused, proactive, and determined to provide better for its 12 million people. Now, the country is an example of how hopes for better health care can become a reality.In the past two decades, the maternal mortality rate in Rwanda hasdropped from 1,071 to 210 deaths per 100,000 live births and the under-five mortality rate has dropped from 196 to 50 deaths per 1,000 live births. Now, 90% of women have skilled assistance during delivery, child immunizations have steadily improved and 93% of children aged 12 to 23 months have received all basic vaccines.And that’s just the beginning. Rwanda is making changes in its maternal and child health care, health workforce, infrastructure, and service delivery to achieve universal access to equal and affordable quality health services. It’s also turning its focus to global health security—the country shares a border with the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is currently experiencing the world’s second-largest Ebola epidemic.We sat down with Samson Radeny, the leader of IntraHealth’s Rwanda programs, to discuss what the future of health care looks like in the count...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases Maternal, Newborn, & Child Health Digital Health Leadership and Governance IntraHealth ' s 40th Anniversary Community Health Workers Source Type: news

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Last year, when I visited the town of Beni, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), people did not shake hands. Bottles of disinfectant and buckets of chlorinated water were at the entrance of every business. Misinformation spread across social networks and on news-sites, and treatment centers in the northeastern province of North Kivu were being attacked by armed militias. At the time, Beni was one of the centers of a devastating Ebola outbreak, the second most deadly in world history. According to the World Health Organization, almost 3,500 people were sickened by the virus, and more than 2,000 died, a case fatali...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Credit: UNBy Ifeanyi Nsofor and Adaeze OrehABUJA, Mar 30 2020 (IPS) As COVID-19 surges globally and leaves fear and panic in its wake, global efforts are underway to find a cure. Yet, the same level of response is lacking for several other infectious diseases that kill millions annually. These kinds of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a broad group of communicable diseases which affect more than two billion people and cost developing economies billions of dollars every year. Lassa Fever is an example and is endemic in Nigeria and other West African countries such as Benin, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) Source Type: news
The recent WHO decision to declare the novel coronavirus outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC), while both appropriate and hardly surprising, offers the opportunity to reflect on the previous PHEIC which was declared, namely the Ebola epidemic in Kivu region, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). And you should really say the ongoing Ebola epidemic, as during the time since the declaration in July 2019 through to the present day (March 2020), a total of 3,453 cases have been reported [1]. The nCoV-2019 outbreak is still ballooning; as of today, over 400,000 confirmed cases worldwide with no ...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs
President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency is designed to speed federal support to parts of America that are struggling to prepare for a coming surge of COVID-19 cases, unlocking $50 billion in aid, giving hospitals and doctors more freedom to handle a potential tsunami of sick patients and scrambling to make tests available. In a Rose Garden press conference Friday, Trump presented the emergency measures as proof that, “No nation is more prepared or more equipped to face down this crisis.” But for epidemiologists, medical experts and current and former U.S. public health officials, the ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation. Read the original article. The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Ignacio López-Goñi is microbiologist and works in University of Navarra (Spain). The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
Okay, I'm not an epidemiologist or a virologist. But I do know something about those subjects, I'm a public health professor, and I am an expert in clinical communication and risk communication. So I'm going to offer some observations that I hope will help people keep this public health scare in proper perspective and maybe be of practical use.There are two important parameters we need to understand the risk caused by any communicable disease. I'm going to broadly say transmissibility, and the probability that exposure will lead to serious disease.We often see transmissibility represented as a single number, called R0 or &...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
By Dr. Lisa Stone, Epidemiology Adviser ; Robert Salerno, Director, Global Health Security Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama, June 6, 2018, as part an Emerging Infectious Diseases Training Event (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen).February 11, 2020A disease spillover event, when a virus moves from animal to human hosts, can cause significant human illness. The coronavirus (COVID-19) seems to have spilled over sometime in late 2019, at a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, leading to more than 40,000 confirmed cases and at least 910 reported deaths&nbs...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases Global Health Security Source Type: news
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., February 11, 2020 – Johnson &Johnson today announced that its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies will further expedite its investigational coronavirus vaccine program through an expanded collaboration with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) at the U.S. Department of Health &Human Services. The collaborative partnership with BARDA builds on Johnson &Johnson’s multipronged response to the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. In addition to Janssen’s effor...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
As the deadly 2019-nCov coronavirus spreads, raising fears of a worldwide pandemic, researchers and startups are using artificial intelligence and other technologies to predict where the virus might appear next — and even potentially sound the alarm before other new, potentially threatening viruses become public health crises. “What we’re doing currently with Coronavirus is really trying to get an understanding of what’s happening on the ground through as many sources as we can get our hands on,” says John Brownstein, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV coronavirus MSFTAI2019 onetime Source Type: news
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news
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