Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on physical symptoms in advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is primarily used for pain, but might be useful for various other physical symptoms, including nausea, fatigue, dyspnea, and constipation. However, few studies have used TENS for treating the physical symptoms of patients with advanced cancer. In this crossover trial, we assess the effects of TENS on pain and other physical symptoms in 20 in-patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative care. For 5-day phases between wash out periods of 5 days, patients received TENS or non-TENS. TENS was delivered at four points: the center of the back for mainly nausea and dyspnea, on the back at the same dermatomal level as the origin of the pain (100 Hz), and on both ankle joints for constipation (10 Hz). The intensity of pain and the total opioid dose used during phases were recorded. Physical symptoms were evaluated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 15 Palliative Care (QLQ-C15-PAL). Hematological and biochemical data were recorded before and after the TENS phase. The average pain and total number of opioid rescue doses were significantly reduced by TENS. TENS tended to improve nausea and appetite loss, but not constipation. There were no effects on hematological and biochemical parameters. Use of TENS could safely improve pain, nausea, and appetite loss in patients with advanced cancer. Although it cannot be used as a substitute for opioids and other phar...
Source: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

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RARITAN, NJ, February 10, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson announced today the submission of a supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking approval of DARZALEX® (daratumumab) in combination with Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) and dexamethasone (DKd) for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. The sBLA is supported by results from the Phase 3 CANDOR study, which compared treatment with DKd to carfilzomib and dexamethasone (Kd) in patients with multiple myeloma who relapsed after one to three prior lines of therapy. “Wh...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Drugs and Supplements Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers diet dieting digestibles digestion digital health gastro gastroenterologist gastroenterology gastrointestinal gluten gut Innovation lactose microbiome stomach techno Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
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Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
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Source: bipolar.and.me - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Margaret's Corner - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Blogroll Source Type: blogs
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Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research
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