Doctors fight coronavirus outbreak with drugs that target HIV, malaria and Ebola

As scientists hunt for an effective drug to treat thousands of patients sickened by a new respiratory virus, they are trying some surprising remedies.
Source: L.A. Times - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news

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AbstractThe current outbreak of the highly transmittable and life-threatening severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has evolved rapidly and posed a global health emergency. Many clinical trials are now being conducted to test possible therapies. To assist this, virtual screening via molecular docking was performed on several FDA-approved drugs, previously used in epidemics, and the top ten compounds were selected. These ten well-characterized drugs, previously used to treat malaria and Ebola infections, were screened based on their interactions with the SARS-CoV-2 ACE2 receptor and 3C-like protease. ...
Source: Network Modeling Analysis in Health Informatics and Bioinformatics - Category: Bioinformatics Source Type: research
Religions for Peace Interreligious Council of Albania distributing Covid relief supplies from the Multi-religious Humanitarian Fund. Credit: Erzen CarjaBy Prof. Azza KaramNEW YORK, Aug 4 2020 (IPS) — I have never been interested in religion or spirituality before, but I found myself tuning in to all sorts of on-line religion and spirituality related forums “in search of something.” These are the words of a 30-something single young, middle class man (born into a Protestant-Catholic family background) in a European country. The latter is known more for turning several churches into museums or shopping ce...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Civil Society Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post How Deforestation Helps Deadly Viruses Jump from Animals to Humans appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Environment Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Many of the people I support in Kinshasa have no money, no soap, no water – and when they are struggling to breathe, no ventilatorsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWe ’re used to emergencies and people dying in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, whether it’s a result of the long-runningconflict or Ebola, cholera and malaria. But coronavirus has knocked us for six, because it has affected people we are very close to.I ’ve been working in development for decades, but I have to admit I have shed tears these past few weeks.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Global development Democratic Republic of the Congo Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science World news Africa Source Type: news
SG Patricia Scotland and President Kagame of Rwanda last year during the annual commemoration of the genocide against the Tutsis. Credit: The Commonwealth SecretariatBy William EllisTORONTO, May 13 2020 (IPS) The Coronovirus pandemic has been an unforgiving test of advanced economies. Health systems in the United States, France, Italy, Spain, and the UK have been put under immense pressure, with shortages of doctors, ventilators, personal protective equipment and the capacity to test for the virus. Their economies have been battered and the consequences are spoken of in terms of the Great Depression. Hope may have emerged...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Economy & Trade Featured Financial Crisis Global Globalisation Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Credit: United NationsBy Dr. Azza Karam and Dr. Mustafa Y. AliNEW YORK, May 8 2020 (IPS) COVID-19 has spread to many nations around the world, and has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. In the global south, the COVID-19 pandemic has stretched the available medical and health resources, triggered economic shocks, and caused social upheavals and insecurity in many countries and localities. While the pandemic has caused huge numbers of infections and deaths in the global north, the consequences in the poorer nations in the global south is acute. Serious challenges arising from responses from authoriti...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Civil Society Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
One of the worst symptoms of any plague is uncertainty—who it will strike, when it will end, why it began. Merely understanding a pandemic does not stop it, but an informed public can help curb its impact and slow its spread. It can also provide a certain ease of mind in a decidedly uneasy time. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 pandemic from TIME’s readers, along with the best and most current answers science can provide. A note about our sourcing: While there are many, many studies underway investigating COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-19, the novel coronavirus that causes the illn...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer Source Type: news
Zororo Makamba wasn’t supposed to die of the novel coronavirus. Not just because of his age, which at 30 placed him well out of the at-risk category for COVID-19 complications, but because of who he was. A well-known, pro-government media personality in Zimbabwe, and the son of a prominent business mogul, Makamba had the wealth and the connections that should have guaranteed him the best care possible. Instead, on March 23, Zimbabwe’s first confirmed case of the coronavirus died alone in a quarantined hospital, three days after his diagnosis. Hospital staff, lacking protective equipment, were afraid to come nea...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
At midnight on Thursday March 26, all of South Africa went into lockdown. For the next 21 days, no one is to leave their homes unless they are going to the grocery store, the pharmacy or to seek medical help. No dog walking, no jogging, no food delivery services. Only essential workers are exempt, and that list is small. When President Cyril Ramaphosa made the announcement on March 23, a week after shutting the nation’s schools, there were only 402 confirmed COVID-19 cases. But it was essential, he said, to “flatten the curve” before widespread outbreaks overwhelmed the country’s fragile medical sys...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
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