IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 1181: Epigenetic Biomarkers for Environmental Exposures and Personalized Breast Cancer Prevention

IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 1181: Epigenetic Biomarkers for Environmental Exposures and Personalized Breast Cancer Prevention International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph17041181 Authors: Hannah Lui Park Environmental and lifestyle factors are believed to account for >80% of breast cancers; however, it is not well understood how and when these factors affect risk and which exposed individuals will actually develop the disease. While alcohol consumption, obesity, and hormone therapy are some known risk factors for breast cancer, other exposures associated with breast cancer risk have not yet been identified or well characterized. In this paper, it is proposed that the identification of blood epigenetic markers for personal, in utero, and ancestral environmental exposures can help researchers better understand known and potential relationships between exposures and breast cancer risk and may enable personalized prevention strategies.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

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Conclusions:These findings provide a recent national picture of HT use in Canada that may be used to inform opportunities for improved physician–patient communication regarding menopause management. Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and factors associated with hormone therapy (HT) use among Canadian women. Methods: Baseline data from the Tracking cohort of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) was used for this analysis. The main outcome was HT use among women aged 45-85 years, defined as current, past, and never users. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to ex...
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA 2Social &Scientific Systems, Inc., Durham, North Carolina, USA 3Westat, Durham, North Carolina, USA 4Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway 5Biostatistics and Computational Biology Branch, NIEHS, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA PDF Version (548 KB) Abstract About This Article Supplemental Material Bac...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: In this cohort of women with elevated risk, high serum 25(OH)D levels and regular vitamin D supplement use were associated with lower rates of incident, postmenopausal breast cancer over 5 y of follow-up. These results may help to establish clinical benchmarks for 25(OH)D levels; in addition, they support the hypothesis that vitamin D supplementation is useful in breast cancer prevention. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP943 About This Article Received: 09 August 2016 Revised: 23 January 2017 Accepted: 06 February 2017 Published: 06 July 2017 Address correspondence to C. R. Weinberg, 111 TW Alexander Dr., Rese...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusion This study provides more evidence of the link between excess body fat and 10 cancers. Though the percentage increases sound large, it's important to put these results into context. For example, the baseline risk of postmenopausal cancer was 2.2% – it occurred in 555 of the 24,751 women in the study. For women who hadn't used hormone therapy, this would increase to a risk of 2.7% if they had a BMI of 30 compared with 26, or a waist circumference of 95cm compared with 84cm. This accounts for only an extra 5 cases in every 1,000 women. This large study involved older adults from European countries, so ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Source Type: news
Conclusions: Weight gain and weight cycling were positively associated with risk of breast and endometrial cancer, respectively. Impact: These data suggest weight cycling and weight gain increase risk of prevalent cancers in postmenopausal women. Adopting ideal body-weight maintenance practices before and after weight loss should be encouraged to reduce risk of incident breast and endometrial cancers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(5); 779–86. ©2017 AACR.
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Articles Source Type: research
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion This study shows a link between the use of combined oestrogen and progesterone HRT and breast cancer risk, particularly among women who take the pill for a long period of time. But this is not the entire story. The study included a large cohort of women. The risk increase for combined HRT is based on only 52 of the 39,183 women taking the combined pill who developed breast cancer. Of these, only seven women had been taking the pill for more than 15 years. Therefore, the analysis was based on a very small number, which may mean the risk associations are not completely accurate....
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Older people Source Type: news
ConclusionWe observed a relatively satisfactory level of understanding regarding the different risk factors for breast cancer despite the lack of indication of any qualitative ranking. Although overweight is a known risk factor for breast cancer, this fact is still not clearly understood among physicians and not widely known by the general public. On the other hand, both physicians and also half of the lay population were well aware of the fact that heredity is a risk factor for breast cancer.Citation Format: Morère J-F, Viguier J, Blay J-Y, Touboul C, Lhomel C, Eisinger F, Pivot X. Awareness of brest cancer risk fa...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Poster Session Abstracts Source Type: research
Conclusion: These analyses suggest an increased risk of breast cancer associated with hormone therapy use—a risk that may be particularly strong among women consuming alcohol.
Source: Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Cancer Source Type: research
According to conventional medical wisdom, menopause-related hot flashes fade away after six to 24 months. Not so, says a new study of women going through menopause. Hot flashes last, on average, for about seven years and may go on for 11 years or more. The hormonal roller coaster that comes with the end of a woman’s childbearing years can trigger a range of symptoms. Up to 80% of women going through menopause experience hot flashes. Hot flashes, also known as vasomotor symptoms, are often described as a sudden sensation of heat in the chest, face, and head followed by flushing, perspiration, and sometimes chills. Whe...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Menopause Women's Health hot flashes night sweats Source Type: news
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