UK coronavirus: How long did it take to stop SARS? What does that mean for coronavirus?

CORONAVIRUS is spreading around the world, with the death toll now surpassing that of the 2002-2003 outbreak of SARS. But how long did it take to stops SARS? What does that mean for the coronavirus outbreak?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Last year, when I visited the town of Beni, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), people did not shake hands. Bottles of disinfectant and buckets of chlorinated water were at the entrance of every business. Misinformation spread across social networks and on news-sites, and treatment centers in the northeastern province of North Kivu were being attacked by armed militias. At the time, Beni was one of the centers of a devastating Ebola outbreak, the second most deadly in world history. According to the World Health Organization, almost 3,500 people were sickened by the virus, and more than 2,000 died, a case fatali...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Respiratory physician John Wilson explains the range of Covid-19 impacts, from no symptoms to severe illness featuring pneumoniaCoronavirus – latest global updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhat became known as Covid-19, or the coronavirus, started in late 2019 as a cluster of pneumonia cases with an unknown cause. The cause of the pneumonia was found to be a new virus – severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or Sars-CoV-2. The illness caused by the virus is Covid-19.Now declared as a pandemic by the World Health Organisation (WHO), the majority of people who contract Covid-19 suffer only mild, c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research World news Science Source Type: news
With scientists still racing to find treatments for Covid-19,Nicola Davis speaks withProf Pall Thordarson about why soap is so effective atdeactivating Sars-CoV-2 and how this differs from hand sanitiser.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Source Type: news
(JAMA Network) The authors describe measures taken to reduce the risk of transmitting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to medical staff and cancer patients seeking treatment during the COVID-19 outbreak in China.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
In late December 2019, a pneumonia outbreak of unknown etiology took place in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, and spread quickly nationwide. Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC) identified a novel beta-coronavirus called 2019-nCoV, now officially known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (Gorbalenya et al., 2020), that responsible for the pandemic. This was the third zoonotic coronavirus breakout in the first two decades of 21st century that allowing human-to-human transmission and raising global health concerns.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
We live in unprecedented modern times experiencing how an outbreak of a particular viral disease, COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, also commonly referred to as the Coronavirus, is disrupting societies and personal lives. The virus is likely to spread to most, if not all, countries, illustrating the interconnectedness of the world. At the time of writing, Italy and Spain have become the epicenters in terms of fatalities in Europe, whereas the United States has recorded the most diagnosed cases worldwide. While many national measures to contain, suppress, mitigate, or delay the spread of the virus are being taken, there is gr...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Mar 31 2020 (IPS) As the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic shifts from China to the developed West, all too many rich countries are acting selfishly, invoking the ‘national interest’, by banning exports of vital medical supplies. US President Donald Trump has reportedly gone further by seeking exclusive rights to a future coronavirus vaccine, although the report has been denied by a German drug company and some investors believed to be involved. Europe first Following France, Germany, the Czech Republic and Poland now also want to ban the expor...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news
Hannah Devlin speaks withProf David Smith about the various ways in which clinicians can test whether or not someone is infected with Sars-CoV-2. And, following the recent announcement that the UK government has bought millions of antibody tests, explores what these might be able to tell usContinue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research Science Hospitals Source Type: news
18 years ago, in 2002, the world was astonished by the appearance of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), supported by a zoonotic coronavirus, called SARS-CoV, from the Guangdong Province of southern China. After about 10 years, in 2012, another similar coronavirus triggered the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) in Saudi Arabia. Both caused severe pneumonia killing 774 and 858 people with 8700 cases of confirmed infection for the former, and 2494 for the latter, causing significant economic losses. 8 years later, despite the MERS outbreak remaining in certain parts of the world, at the end of 2019, a new zoo...
Source: The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
A novel betacoronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which caused a large respiratory outbreak in Wuhan, China in December 2019, is currently spreading across many countries globally. Here, we show that a TMPRSS2-expressing VeroE6 cell line is highly susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection, making it useful for isolating and...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Brief Reports, Coronavirus (COVID-19) Biological Sciences Source Type: research
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