Mind-body therapies can reduce pain and opioid use

Our ability to feel pain and react to it is both a boon and a curse, simultaneously. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) defines pain as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage.” This means that pain is highly subjective, and it is informed by a mix of past experiences, our current emotional state, and future expectations. Since pain is an emotional and sensory experience it affects our quality of life immensely, and treatment is complex. Chronic pain management with opioids is not ideal Opioids are among the most potent medications used to manage pain. Opioids curb pain by blocking pain signals between the brain and the body. This class of medication also relaxes the brain, providing a sense of calm and euphoria, and there is a high risk of addiction. Opioid misuse is more pronounced in people who have had surgery and been given opioids than in people who have not had surgery. The longer a person uses opioids, the greater risk of their misusing these medications. The ongoing opioid epidemic has led physicians to look for adjunct and nonmedication therapies to help people reduce opioid use and still effectively manage pain. Mind-body therapies for pain management Mind-body therapies (MBTs) are integrative practices, and they include breathing exercises and/or body movements aimed at achieving relaxation of mind and body. Some MBTs are Isha yoga, vi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Mind body medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs

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The opioid epidemic has had far reaching consequences for bariatric surgeons. We have had an awakening and have collectively realized that our sub-specialty has to do a better job at protecting our patients from this destructive addiction process. In a study of nine hospital systems in the US, 4.0% of patients who were not chronic opioid users prior to bariatric surgery converted to chronic use after surgery.1 Another similar study indicated that 77% of bariatric surgical patients who were on chronic pain medicines prior to surgery, not only remained on opioid therapy post surgically , but collectively increased their over...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
More than 25 million Americans suffer from daily chronic pain, a highly debilitating medical condition that is complex and difficult to manage. In recent decades, there has been an overreliance on the prescription of opioids for chronic pain, contributing to a significant and alarming epidemic of opioid overdose deaths and addiction. Innovative scientific solutions to develop non-opioid, non-addictive alternative treatment options are thus urgently needed. One of the goals of the Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative is to accelerate the discovery and preclinical development of new medications and devices to...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
More than 25 million Americans suffer from daily chronic pain, a highly debilitating medical condition that is complex and difficult to manage. In recent decades, there has been an overreliance on the prescription of opioids for chronic pain, contributing to a significant and alarming epidemic of opioid overdose deaths and addiction. Innovative scientific solutions to develop non-opioid, non-addictive alternative treatment options are thus urgently needed. One of the goals of the Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative is to accelerate the discovery and preclinical development of new medications and devices to...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
Contributors to the ongoing epidemic of prescription opioid abuse, addiction, and death include opioid tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, and possibly opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Thirty stable chronic non-malignant pain patients entered a six-month long, randomized, double-blind, dose-response, two-center trial of the potent opioid levorphanol, conducted over a decade ago during an era of permissive opioid prescribing. Eleven were taking no opioids at study entry and eleven were taking between 35-122 morphine equivalents (MEQ).
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Tags: Original Reports Source Type: research
ConclusionsA significant number of patients with IC are treated with opioids. Although the overall number of opioid prescriptions associated with IC had declined, the prescription rate per IC diagnosis had not. As part of the national initiative to reduce opioid use, our data suggest that IC treatment strategies should be examined.
Source: International Urogynecology Journal - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
If we can say anything for certain about caring for persons in pain over the past decade is that it has prompted concern and confusion on how to provide the best care. Consider the following: Do we have an opioid epidemic or an opioid crisis in the United States? Does the difference in these words matter? What about the “other” less publicized public health crisis; chronic pain; where did that conversation go? Are opioid analgesics good or bad to treat people in pain? Should nurses be prepared in pain care, addiction care or both? What are the differences in state policies that govern and guide nursing practice...
Source: Pain Management Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Chronic pain is one of the most debilitating, difficult to treat, chronic health conditions and affects at least 20% of the American adult population.7 In addition to the direct impact on quality of life via health consequences, chronic pain is widely believed to be causally related to the current opioid epidemic.24
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Tags: Original Reports Source Type: research
Abstract In this paper, I propose an economic theory that addresses the epidemic character of opioid epidemics. I consider a community in which individuals are heterogenous with respect to the experience of chronic pain and susceptibility to addiction and live through two periods. In the first period they consider whether to treat pain with opioid pain relievers (OPRs). In the second period they consider whether to continue non-medical opioid use to mitigate cravings from addiction. Non-medical opioid use is subject to social disapproval, which depends negatively on the share of opioid addicts in the community. An...
Source: Economics and Human Biology - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Econ Hum Biol Source Type: research
According to a new report by Orange County, California’s health care agency, the overdose deaths in Orange County have greatly surpassed that of Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Ventura, and Santa Barbara counties and, most shockingly, all of California as a whole. The opioid crisis in Orange County has grown so much that a high concentration of treatment centers has popped up in the area hoping to combat this issue, but it doesn’t seem to be enough. In addition, the report details that the majority of state-licensed treatment centers and unregulated sober living homes are located along the c...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates opiate abuse opiate addiction opioid opioid crisis opioids orange county Source Type: blogs
Opioids are so highly addictive that they have created a dangerous and deadly epidemic in the United States. In fact, the National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that more than 2 million Americans abuse opioids and that more than 90 Americans die on average by opioid overdose every day. Individuals can become addicted to opioids so quickly that it can be difficult to notice when the line has been crossed over to opioid abuse. If you or your loved one is taking opioids, whether legal or illegal, make note of these signs and symptoms of opioid abuse and how to get help. How Does Opioid Abuse Begin? Opioids work by binding ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates abuse heroin heroin addiction heroin users opiate abuse opioid opioid crisis opioids prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction Source Type: blogs
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