Coronavirus Researchers Are Using High-Tech Methods to Predict Where the Virus Might Go Next

As the deadly 2019-nCov coronavirus spreads, raising fears of a worldwide pandemic, researchers and startups are using artificial intelligence and other technologies to predict where the virus might appear next — and even potentially sound the alarm before other new, potentially threatening viruses become public health crises. “What we’re doing currently with Coronavirus is really trying to get an understanding of what’s happening on the ground through as many sources as we can get our hands on,” says John Brownstein, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor at Harvard Medical School. After SARS killed 774 people around the world in the mid-2000s, his team built a tool called Healthmap, which scrapes information about new outbreaks from online news reports, chatrooms and more. Healthmap then organizes that previously disparate data, generating visualizations that show how and where communicable diseases like the coronavirus are spreading. Healthmap’s output supplements more traditional data-gathering techniques used by organizations like the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The project’s data is being used by clinicians, researchers and governments. As of early February, Healthmap’s 2019-nCov data visualization shows China covered with colored dots. Yellow means fewer than 10 cases have been reported in a particular location, with ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV coronavirus MSFTAI2019 onetime Source Type: news

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Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
Abstract Interspecies transmissions of viruses between animals and humans may result in unpredictable pathogenic potential and new transmissible diseases. This mechanism has recently been exemplified by the discovery of new pathogenic viruses, such as the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, Middle-East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus epidemic in Saudi Arabia, and the deadly outbreak of Ebola in West Africa. The. SARS-CoV-2 causes coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), which is having a massive global impact in terms of economic disruption, and, above all, human health. The di...
Source: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
Authors: Xiong R, Zhang L, Li S, Sun Y, Ding M, Wang Y, Zhao Y, Wu Y, Shang W, Jiang X, Shan J, Shen Z, Tong Y, Xu L, Chen Y, Liu Y, Zou G, Lavillete D, Zhao Z, Wang R, Zhu L, Xiao G, Lan K, Li H, Xu K Abstract Emerging and re-emerging RNA viruses occasionally cause epidemics and pandemics worldwide, such as the on-going outbreak of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Herein, we identified two potent inhibitors of human DHODH, S312 and S416, with favorable drug-likeness and pharmacokinetic profiles, which all showed broad-spectrum antiviral effects against various RNA viruses, including influenza A virus, Zika virus,...
Source: Protein and Cell - Category: Cytology Tags: Protein Cell Source Type: research
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
Ongoing destruction of nature will result in stream of animal diseases jumping to humans, says reportCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe world is treating the health and economic symptoms of the coronavirus pandemic but not the environmental cause, according to the authors of aUN report. As a result, a steady stream of diseases can be expected to jump from animals to humans in coming years, they say.The number of such“zoonotic” epidemics is rising, from Ebola to Sars to West Nile virus and Rift Valley fever, with the root cause being the destruction of nature by humans and the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Environment Wildlife Infectious diseases Farming Medical research Science World news United Nations Health Sars Meat industry Farm animals Source Type: news
Patients lie motionless in a hospital ICU ward, as doctors hurry around their beds. The patients’ faces are concealed by ventilators; the doctors’ by masks. The death rate is rising so quickly that doctors can no longer keep count. “The beds don’t even have time to cool before they are taken up by other patients,” says ICU nurse Cristina Pilati. Yet over the sound of stretchers rolling and monitors beeping, Pilati starts singing the lyrics of ‘Angel’ as she cares for a teenage boy in the ICU. ‘Spend all your time waiting, for that second chance,’ she sings. ‘For a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Londontime Source Type: news
In the coronavirus era, a host of epidemiological terms have entered common public use. There’s the now-ubiquitous “social distancing,” and the newly politicized “flatten the curve.” And as states and local governments seek a way out of lockdowns that have brought their economies to a near-standstill, “contact tracing” has made its way into everyday conversation as well. But what exactly is contact tracing, and how can it help society battle the COVID-19 epidemic? Here, the basics of the time-tested public health strategy, and the hopes for its use in the coronavirus pandemic: Wh...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONThe pre ‐​COVID‐​19 research is unanimous that governments cannot expect to rely on travel restrictions to prevent the spread of pandemics similar to influenza. Travel restrictions do not prevent the spread of disease and may only delay it for a few days or weeks if implemented prior to the interna tional transmission of the disease. The Trump administration’s travel restrictions waited until after the virus had already entered the United States, and they exempted many travelers from China, not to mention the rest of the world.[30]The research shows that the Trump administration should have kno...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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