Army Inches Closer To Develop Zika And Dengue Virus Vaccine

Mosquito-carried diseases such as the Zika virus and Dengue still continue to thrive in warm temperate parts of the world, but new US army research suggests we are on the cusp of figuring out a vaccine that could potentially work to fight both these infections.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news

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Viruses transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, such as dengue, Zika, and chikungunya, have expanding ranges and seem unabated by current vector control programs. Effective control of these pathogens likely requires integrated approaches. We evaluated dengue management options in an endemic setting that combine novel vector control and vaccination using an agent-based...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
Patients infected with the Dengue virus (DENV) often present with a massive generation of DENV-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) in the blood. In some cases, these ASCs represent more than 50% of the circulating B cells, a higher magnitude than those induced by other infections, vaccinations, and plasma cell lymphomas. However, it remains unclear how the DENV infection elicits this colossal response. To address this issue, we utilised an in vitro strategy to induce human PBMCs of healthy individuals incubated with DENV particles (DENV4 TVP/360) to differentiate into ASCs. As controls, PBMCs were incubated with a mit...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur data point to an important role of flavivirus-specific IgM during the transient early stages of infection, by contributing substantially to neutralization and by counteracting ADE. In addition, our results highlight structural differences between strains of Zika and dengue viruses that are used for analyzing infection-enhancement by cross-reactive antibodies. These findings underscore the possible impact of specific antibody patterns on flavivirus disease and vaccination efficacy.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) A new study led by WRAIR scientists has shown for the first time that a single dose of an experimental Zika vaccine in a dengue-experienced individual can boost pre-existing flavivirus immunity and elicit protective cross-neutralizing antibody responses against both Zika and dengue viruses. Findings were published today in Nature Medicine. Three Phase 1 human clinical trials have shown ZPIV to be safe and well-tolerated in healthy adults and that it induced a robust immune response.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
by Erick Mora-C árdenas, Chiara Aloise, Valentina Faoro, Nataša Knap Gašper, Miša Korva, Ilaria Caracciolo, Pierlanfranco D’Agaro, Tatjana Avšič-Županc, Alessandro Marcello Flaviviruses are relevant animal and human pathogens of increasing importance worldwide. The similarities of the initial clinical symptoms and the serological cross-reactivity of viral structural antigens make a laboratory diagnosis of flavivirus infection problematic. The main aim of the present study was the comparative specificity and sensitivity analysis of the non-structural protein NS1 as an antigen to d...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) A new study led by researchers at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) and the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine found that routinely giving the Zika vaccine to women of childbearing age could save money if the risk of Zika is around that of other mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and chikungunya.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
West Nile (WN) virus infection of humans is frequently asymptomatic, but can also lead to WN fever or neuroinvasive disease. CD4 T cells and B cells are critical in the defense against WN virus, and neutralizing antibodies, which are directed against the viral glycoprotein E, are an accepted correlate of protection. For the efficient production of these antibodies, B cells interact directly with CD4 helper T cells that recognize peptides from E or the two other structural proteins (capsid-C and membrane-prM/M) of the virus. However, the specific protein sites yielding such helper epitopes remain unknown. Here, we explored ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) are antigenically related mosquito-transmitted viruses which represent a big public health problem. Although the antigenic cross-reactivity between two viruses were intensively investigated at the antibody and T cell levels, how DENV envelope protein domain III (EDIII)-elicited antibodies (Abs) impact the outcome of ZIKV infection is uncertain. Here, our results show that the sera isolated from DENV-EDIII-immunized wild-type mice recognized ZIKV-EDIII and cross-neutralized ZIKV in vitro. Passive transfer of DENV-EDIII-immune sera protected 1-day-old mice against l...
Source: Virus Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Virus Res Source Type: research
Conclusions/SignificanceAchieving high uptake and compliance with PPT in populations most at risk of adverse outcomes from Zika infection requires engaging key users in open dialogue to identify and address any practical issues regarding PPT use, and concerns over safety. The findings presented here suggest that educational campaigns should strongly emphasize the risks associated with Zika during pregnancy, and discuss safety profiles of approved synthetic repellents and the availability of EPA-approved plant-based repellents. In addition, the economic and political context should be a major consideration when evaluating p...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
(University of Queensland) A new technology to produce safer 'hybrid' viruses at high volumes for use in vaccines and diagnostics for mosquito-borne diseases has been developed at The University of Queensland.Researchers from UQ and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have exploited the benign characteristics of the Binjari virus - inert to humans - to produce 'dangerous looking' mosquito-borne viruses such as Zika and dengue, but which cannot grow in humans or animals.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
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