The Next Frontier: Universal HCV Screening in pregnant women

There is worldwide enthusiasm for the elimination of hepatitis C (HCV). The availability of highly effective and safe direct acting anti-viral agents to treat almost everyone with HCV infection means that HCV elimination is now primarily a public health challenge. Making progress towards HCV elimination requires screening to increase the proportion of HCV-infected persons who are aware of their status, linking to and retaining them in care to achieve cure, and increasing access to harm reduction services to prevent new infections.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Expert Review Source Type: research

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PMID: 32168232 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In this cohort, the seroprevalence of HCV antibody was low, and the current risk factors for HCV screening were not identified. These findings may be useful in defining new strategies for identifying mothers with the HCV antibody and the neonates susceptible to maternal transmission of HCV. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01959321. PMID: 32168224 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects 170 million people worldwide, with at least 5% of individuals with HCV progressing to life-threatening complications, including hepatocellular carcinoma, within 20 years from acute infection. The World Health Organization has called for viral hepatitis elimination as a major public health threat by 2030. The recent development and availability of direct-acting antiviral drugs have been a game-changer in the HCV-treatment paradigm-response exceeds 90%, with minimal adverse events. Accordingly, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the American Association for...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
There is worldwide enthusiasm for the elimination of hepatitis C (HCV). The availability of highly effective and safe direct-acting antiviral agents to treat almost everyone with HCV infection means that HCV elimination is now primarily a public health challenge. Making progress toward HCV elimination requires screening to increase the proportion of HCV-infected persons who are aware of their status, linking to and retaining them in care to achieve cure, and increasing access to harm reduction services to prevent new infections.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Expert Review Source Type: research
ConclusionThis case highlights and adds to the growing body of evidence supporting the need for universal screening for hepatitis C in ICP patients and the potential role for repeat SBA testing, which would be a notable change from the traditional care of these individuals.
Source: Case Reports in Womens Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Authors: Ifeorah IM, Bakarey AS, Akubo AO, Onyemelukwe FN Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with liver complicated diseases resulting in end-stage hepatocellular carcinoma. Although vertical transmission from mother to child serves as one of the routes of HCV acquisition in children, yet HCV infection in pregnant women and children is still underappreciated in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, this study investigated the burden of HCV, associated risk factors, and viremia among antenatal and postnatal clinic attendees in the rural and urban communities of Kogi State, Nigeria. Atotal of 176 blood samples w...
Source: Journal of Immunoassay and Immunochemistry - Category: Biochemistry Tags: J Immunoassay Immunochem Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The reported prevalence of maternal HCV infection has increased 161% from 2009 to 2017. PMID: 31923064 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by persistent high-level viremia and defective cellular immunity, including a lack of functional HCV-specific CD4+ T cells. We previously described an exceptional period of viral control that occurs in some chronically infected women after childbirth. Here, we investigated whether reduced HCV replication after pregnancy is associated with recovery of CD4+ T cell immunity. Class II tetramer analysis revealed significantly greater frequencies of circulating HCV-specific CD4+ T cells at 3 months postpartum in women with concurrent declines in viremia compared with tho...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Parenteral transmission is the major route of hepatitis C virus transmission in adults; however, vertical transmission is most common in children. There are several factors that have been shown to be associated with vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus, including hepatitis C virus RNA, human immunodeficiency virus coinfection, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell infection. As there is no effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus infection, and there are no human data describing the safety of the new direct acting antiviral agents in pregnancy, the only preventive strategy for vertical transmission is to treat ...
Source: Gastroenterology Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Features Source Type: research
SMFM currently recommends anti-HCV antibody testing in pregnant patients with risk factors (RFs). However, due to HCV prevalence and 95-99% cure rates using antiviral treatments, universal testing is in question. Recently (2019), there have been 2 publications on universal HCV testing using simulation models both reporting cost-effectiveness. However, through a literature search, we did not find any large prospective study evaluating actual capture rates (&cost-effectiveness) comparing testing based on RFs vs.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session II Source Type: research
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