Going On A Cruise? Here ’ s How The Coronavirus Will Change Your Trip

(CNN) — Royal Caribbean normally encourages cruise-goers to drop off their luggage, hop on the ship and run off to enjoy their vacations. That’s all changed since the coronavirus outbreak. Spooked by the deadly disease, cruise companies around the world are imposing extraordinary measures to curb its spread, from taking passengers’ temperature before boarding to denying entry to people who’ve recently visited China. Those fears were on full display in the past two weeks, with at least three cruises being quarantined after some passengers showed symptoms. CBS New York: Cruise Ship Passengers Screened For Coronavirus After Docking In New Jersey As of Friday morning, the coronavirus had killed 638 people, mostly in China. There were 31,479 confirmed cases around the world, with over 31,100 in China alone. More than 30 million people are expected to take a cruise this year, according to Cruise Lines International Association. If you’re one of them, here’s what you can expect. You’ll be turned away if you’ve been to China recently Miami-based Royal Caribbean is turning away passengers and crew members who’ve been to mainland China, Hong Kong or Macau in the 15 days before their trip, according to a statement on the firm’s website. Swiss company MSC Cruises is denying boarding to passengers who’ve been to mainland China in the past 30 days, according to a February 4 statement on its website. All guests have to fill o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Coronavirus Source Type: news

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After the outbreak of the coronavirus 2019-nCov (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China, in December 2019,[1] the disease rapidly became a global pandemic. Infection rates peaked and began to decline in some Asian countries by March 2020, but Europe and the US are now among the most affected regions.[2] Most COVID-19 infections are characterized by only mild symptoms of fever and cough; however, there is a high risk of severe pulmonary infection and death, in particular for the elderly and populations with comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension and cardiopulmonary diseases.
Source: Radiotherapy and Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
If you have no symptoms of the coronavirus, should you wear a mask? It’s one of the most-asked questions during this pandemic, and until recently, one of the most easily answered—if you follow the guidance of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC’s answer, up until April 3? No. According to its initial guidelines, outside of health care settings, face masks should only be worn by people who are sick or who are caring for someone who is sick (when the person who is sick can’t wear a mask). A mask helps capture some of an ill person’s cough particles that might otherwise s...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
ant J, Duchin JS, Clark TA, Honein MA, Reddy SC, Jernigan JA, Public Health – Seattle &King County, CDC COVID-19 Investigation Team Abstract Older adults are susceptible to severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes as a consequence of their age and, in some cases, underlying health conditions (1). A COVID-19 outbreak in a long-term care skilled nursing facility (SNF) in King County, Washington that was first identified on February 28, 2020, highlighted the potential for rapid spread among residents of these types of facilities (2). On March 1, a health care provider at a second long-term care s...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
THE CURRENT pandemic stemming from severe acute respiratory syndrome –related coronavirus-2 began in December 2019 with an outbreak of pneumonia in Wuhan, China.1,2 Since the initial cases, the outbreak has spread rapidly around the world, presenting health care systems with a global health crisis. This enveloped virus has an incubation period up to 14 days and pro duces a spectrum of clinical disease in humans.3 It can vary from mild upper respiratory tract infection with fever and cough to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome that may progress to sepsis and multiorgan failure.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Tuesday, March 10. Speech-language pathologist Fatima Warren was grocery shopping with her grandmother when she first noticed the painful body aches. Chalking it up to the rainy day and an earlier workout, she ran a hot bath. Wednesday, March 11. Warren woke up with chills, fever, and worsening aches. She drove straight to the closest ER in her hometown of Lexington, Kentucky. There, staff ran numerous tests, but not for COVID-19. The 45-year-old didn’t qualify because she hadn’t traveled outside the country and couldn’t name a contact with the virus. Thursday, March 12. Worried about infecting her 13-yea...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Slider Speech-Language Pathology Uncategorized acute care Cognitive Rehabilitation Dysphagia FEES Health Care MBSS personal protective equipment skilled nursing facilities Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs
Shia Wu Predicting the number of new suspected or confirmed cases of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is crucial in the prevention and control of the COVID-19 outbreak. Social media search indexes (SMSI) for dry cough, fever, chest distress, coronavirus, and pneumonia were collected from 31 December 2019 to 9 February 2020. The new suspected cases of COVID-19 data were collected from 20 January 2020 to 9 February 2020. We used the lagged series of SMSI to predict new suspected COVID-19 case numbers during this period. To avoid overfitting, five methods, namely subset selection, forward selection, lasso ...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
(HAMBURG, Pa.) — The spring breezes of 2020 are carrying more than just tree pollen. There’s a whiff of paranoia in the air. For millions of seasonal allergy sufferers, the annual onset of watery eyes and scratchy throats is bumping up against the global spread of a new virus that produces its own constellation of respiratory symptoms. Forecasters are predicting a brutal spring allergy season for swaths of the U.S. at the same time that COVID-19 cases are rising dramatically. That’s causing angst for people who never have had to particularly worry about their hay fever, other than to stock up on antihista...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
written by Dr. Stephen A. Berger A frightening pandemic arises from animals in Asia and spreads westward, killing thousands in Italy, France, Spain, and many other countries. The more severe infections are characterized by cough and fever, leading to progressive pneumonia. There is no specific treatment available, and entire cultures live in fear and uncertainty.   And so, during 541-542 C.E. Yersinia pestis the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, spread out from China into the Byzantine Empire. Few were spared, and an estimated 25 to 100 million Europeans went on to die during repeated waves of infec...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology Events Outbreaks Source Type: blogs
(WASHINGTON) — The Trump administration is sticking with its crowd-friendly waiver of entrance fees at national parks during the coronavirus pandemic, as managers at some parks try and fail to keep visitors a safe distance apart and communities appeal for a shutdown at other parks that are still open. While the Interior Department agreed this week to requests from local managers of Yellowstone and some other iconic national parks to close, others remained open and newly free of charge. In Arizona, local governments and the Navajo Nation were waiting for an answer Thursday on their request earlier this week for federa...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news
(BOSTON) — Neil Diamond posts a fireside rendition of “Sweet Caroline” with its familiar lyrics tweaked to say, “Hands … washing hands.” A news anchor asks when social distancing will end because “my husband keeps trying to get into the house.” And a sign outside a neighborhood church reads: “Had not planned on giving up quite this much for Lent.” Are we allowed to chuckle yet? We’d better, psychologists and humorists say. Laughter can be the best medicine, they argue, so long as it’s within the bounds of good taste. And in a crisis, it can be a power...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
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